FT-IR and RAMAN Spectrometers - Powerful Investigative Tools for Semiconductor Applications by Bruker Optics

Topics Covered

About Bruker Optics
Semiconductors Applications
Silicon Quality Control
For the Whole Range of Materials
Carbon and Oxygen Quantification
Determination of Shallow Impurities
Semiconductor Research and Development
PLII-Modul

About Bruker Optics

Bruker Optics, part of the Bruker Corporation (NASDAQ:BRKR) is the leading manufacturer and worldwide supplier of Fourier Transform Infrared, Near Infrared and Raman spectrometers for various industries and applications.

Bruker entered the field of FT-IR spectroscopy in 1974. The early instruments set new standards in research FT-IR with evacuable optics, high resolution and automatic range change. Since then, the product line has been continuously expanding with instruments suitable for both analytical and research applications with exceptional performance characteristics.

Today, Bruker Optics offers FT-IR, NIR, Raman, TD-NMR, TeraHertz spectrometers and imaging spectrographs for various markets and applications. Bruker Optics has R&D and manufacturing centers in Ettlingen, Germany and The Woodlands, USA, technical support centers and sales offices throughout Europe, North and South America and Asia.

Semiconductors Applications

Bruker Optics provides the expertise and leading FT-IR spectrometer technology for reliable and non-destructive Silicon quality control with infrared light for photovoltaics and electronics. Benefit from more than 30 years of experience in the field of infrared based semiconductor analysis. Bruker Optics FT-IR and RAMAN spectrometers are powerful investigative tools for a whole range of materials.

Silicon Quality Control

  • CryoSAS industrial Silicon quality control
  • Carbon and oxygen content analysis at room temperature
  • Measurement of shallow impurities like boron and phosphorous by transmittance and/or photoluminescence (PL) at low temperature
  • Analysis of passivation layers on semiconductors Epi-layer thickness determination

For the Whole Range of Materials

  • Contactless sample measurement technique
  • At room, liquid N2 and liquid He temperatures
  • According to SEMI, ASTM and DIN standards
  • Transmittance, reflectance and photoluminescence mode
  • Applicable for macro- and microsized samples

Carbon and Oxygen Quantification

Silicon based devices, such as integrated circuits, play a key role in everyday life. Furthermore, against the background of limited fossil fuels, Silicon based solar cells gain more and more in importance.

The majority of industrially produced Silicon is grown by processes (e.g. the Czochralski method), resulting in significant concentrations of interstitial Oxygen and substitutional Carbon. Depending on concentration as well as on the final application, these impurities can have both harmful and beneficial effects. For instance the efficiency of solar cells decreases, if the Oxygen concentration is too high. On the other hand, in moderate concentrations Oxygen acts e.g. as a getter for metallic trace impurities, reducing the leakage current of the final device.

Determination of Shallow Impurities

Besides the concentration of Carbon and Oxygen also the content of so-called shallow impurities is of prime importance since they significantly affect the electrical properties (e.g. the resistivity) of the material. Shallow impurities can be subdivided into the group V elements P, As and Sb, acting as electron donors and the group III elements B, Al, Ga and In, affecting the Silicon as electron acceptors.

Semiconductor Research and Development

  • Phonon spectroscopy
  • Bandgap studies
  • Photoluminescence

PLII-Modul

AlGaInAs quantum wells

The PLII module is suitable for photoluminescence measurements in research and development. Typical applications are e.g. the investigation of semiconductor nanostructures, organic semiconductors or doped crystals. The module can be adapted to any spectrometer of the VERTEX series and offers a broad range of options such as low temperature measurements or photoluminescence mapping.

 

Source Bruker Optics

For more information on this source please visit Bruker Optics

Date Added: May 11, 2010 | Updated: Sep 23, 2013
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