High-Contrast Electron Microscopy in Cell Biology and Pathology

By AZoNano Staff Writers

Topics Covered

Introduction
LVEM5 Microscope
How the LVEM5 Helps
Miniature Form Factor
Resolution and Contrast
Accessibility
About Delong America

Introduction

The high contrast imaging offered by the LVEM5 is a key advantage in cell biology. Electron microscopy enables the study of the functions, activities, properties and organization of cells. This offers a deep understanding of organization and function within cells.

Electron microscopy approaches complement light microscopy by offering greater detail. Electron microscopy is the only method with sufficient resolution to localize proteins to small membrane sub-domains within the cell. Researchers can better understand the location and organization of organelles, actin filaments in the cytoskeleton, and molecular complexes such as nuclear pores.

Although there are instances where staining is desirable for diagnostic purposes, the necessity to stain samples in order to generate adequate detailed contrast cannot be viewed as advantageous.

The LVEM5 still enables for staining as an option, yet high contrast result are acquired from samples in their inherent, natural state. This offers images without the side effects often encountered such as staining artifacts or the sample crashing out by chemical reaction with heavy metals.

Electron microscopy conventionally is one of the most challenging techniques to learn. The simplicity of LVEM5 combined with the elimination of the staining step makes it accessible to many more researchers. The versatile LVEM5 electron microscope operates with four distinct imaging modes TEM, SEM, STEM and ED. This provides for comprehensive imaging and finer study.

Whether it's in the fields of pathology or other life sciences, researchers and medical professionals are assured of top notch imaging with LVEM5 microscopes. The LVEM5 in cell biology and pathology can be particularly useful both in routine microscopy and in research.

LVEM5 Microscope

For routine examination of pathological specimens, the instrument generates images that are identical to those generated by a conventional 80KV transmission electron microscope. The LVEM5 has the benefit of avoiding post-sectioning staining with heavy metals such as lead citrate and uranyl acetate.

Even without counterstaining, the tissue reveals the usual cellular structures as a standard 80KV transmission microscope due to the high contrast generated by the low voltage.

Compared to standard electron microscopes, the LVEM5 has the being of very small size and the time for the examination of a sample is reduced to a minimum. In active morphological research and cell biology of cellular and sub-cellular structures, this instrument opens an entirely new field.

Fixation with osmium tetroxide is not needed anymore to generate contrasted images of cell membranes and cell components. Also, because of the fact that electrons are not highly accelerated, penetration, scattering and transmission of electrons through the section are highly efficient and generate differences in contrasts within cell structures that, till now, were considered quite homogeneous.

Hence, heterogeneities and sub-structures unknown up to now can be revealed within cellular compartment that were considered homogeneous. The LVEM5 carries a great potential for advancing our comprehension of cellular structures and of their composition and organization.

Figure 1. Selected images

How the LVEM5 Helps

The LVEM5 is a suitable addition to any pathology or cell biology laboratory. Its multimodal imaging capabilities makes it a comprehensive imaging tool. The LVEM5 is a 3-in-1 electron microscope. It is not just a transmission electron microscope but can be configured to two different scanning microscope (SEM) and scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM).

With the LVEM5 one can switch between imaging modes without moving the sample. Both surface and transmission images from the same area of interest can be captured. Nanoparticles can be better understood with a single tool.

Miniature Form Factor

The only multi-modal electron microscope in a bench-top configuration is the LVEM5. There is no need to send batches of samples to a core imaging facility any more. The compact size of the LVEM5 implies that it can be installed in your workspace, right where you need it.

There is no need for a dedicated facility for installation. No special cooling or power requirements are needed and vibration isolation is generally not a concern.

Resolution and Contrast

The LVEM5 may be compact but it can measure resolve objects as small as 2nm in scanning and transmission modes. Furthermore, the LVEM5 can produce better images than a conventional TEM without a need for stain. The LVEM5 easily produces high quality images suitable for presentations or publications.

Accessibility

The LVEM5 is so remarkably simple that anyone can use it. There will no longer be a need for highly trained technicians to take electron micrographs. The controls are intuitively configured on an ergonomically designed remote control panel that can be positioned as required. Feedback is provided directly on the control panel as well as through the LVME5’s comprehensive software. Every LVEM5 installation includes personalized on-site training. Users capture meaningful images by the end of training.

About Delong America

The Delong group of companies operates in the high tech, engineering design, manufacturing and sales sectors and span two continents with operations in Europe and North America.

Our facilities in Brno, Czech republic are specialized in the design and manufacturing of precision components and electron optics and vacuum technologies. In the summer of 2007 Delong will open its new building which will be equipped with the latest in design and precision manufacturing innovations.

This information has been sourced, reviewed and adapted from materials provided by Delong America.

For more information on this source, please visit Delong America.

Date Added: Dec 18, 2013 | Updated: Dec 19, 2013
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