Posted in | Nanoelectronics

Singapore Researchers Discover Quantum Plasmonic Tunneling with FEI Electron Microscope

Published on June 24, 2014 at 11:57 AM

FEI (NASDAQ: FEIC) congratulates its customers, National University of Singapore, Singapore University of Technology and Design, and the A*STAR institutes: Institute of High Performance Computing and Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, on their recent discovery of quantum plasmonic tunneling - a finding they described in Science on the 28th of March[1].

FEI Titan™ scanning/transmission electron microscope

Plasmon tunneling is a quantum-mechanical effect where electrons rapidly oscillate across very closely-spaced metal structures. Using a Titan™ scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM), the scientists were able to not only observe this new phenomenon directly, but also control the frequency of the tunneling currents by placing single layers of different molecules between the closely-spaced metal particles. The speed of the switching will directly depend on the nature of the molecules used.

“In our research, we were able to demonstrate that the rapid current oscillations could take place over distances larger than a nanometer, which, although extremely small, opens up possibilities for new technological applications,” states one of the researchers and Science paper authors, Dr Michel Bosman, Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR, Singapore.

Surface plasmons in metal particles can be introduced by simply shining light of the right color on them. By using the researchers’ approach, incoming light will then produce the small tunneling currents between the nearby metal particles. In effect, tiny electrical circuits are made that operate at enormously high speeds.

Today’s electrical circuits can operate up to GHz frequencies, but due to design issues, this is close to their inherent speed limit at room temperature. In order for devices to work faster, entirely new circuit designs are required. The research presented here shows a possible route for such optical circuits, by light-generated tunneling currents with operation speeds tens of thousands of times faster than today’s microprocessors.

Trisha Rice, vice president and general manager of Materials Science for FEI, comments, “This is incredible work being done by these researchers in Singapore, using the high-energy resolution of a monochromated Titan S/TEM to directly observe and control a quantum plasmonic tunneling event. Congratulations on this achievement and we look forward to learning of new and exciting results in this area.”

1. “Quantum Plasmon Resonances Controlled by Molecular Tunnel Junctions,” Shu Fen Tan et al, Science 343, 1496 (2014); DOI 10.1126/science. 1248797.

About FEI

FEI Company (Nasdaq: FEIC) designs, manufactures and supports a broad range of high-performance microscopy workflow solutions that provide images and answers at the micro-, nano- and picometer scales. Its innovation and leadership enable customers in industry and science to increase productivity and make breakthrough discoveries.  Headquartered in Hillsboro, Ore., USA, FEI has over 2,600 employees and sales and service operations in more than 50 countries around the world. More information can be found at: www.fei.com.

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