Site Sponsors
  • Strem Chemicals - Nanomaterials for R&D
  • Oxford Instruments Nanoanalysis - X-Max Large Area Analytical EDS SDD
  • Park Systems - Manufacturer of a complete range of AFM solutions

mPhase Technologies to Develop Smart Nanobattery with US Army

Published on February 7, 2007 at 1:55 PM

mPhase Technologies today announced that it has signed a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) from the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center (ARDEC) at Picatinny New Jersey.

The purpose of the agreement is to cooperatively test and evaluate the mPhase Smart Nano battery and ultra-sensitive magnetometer. The army researchers will further evaluate the prototypes using the Army's testing facilities at Picatinny Arsenal in New Jersey in order to potentially incorporate the technologies into programs sponsored by Picatinny.

Carlos Pereira, the ARDEC Advanced Precision Concepts Branch Chief and Principal Investigator said, "We are pleased to work with mPhase to explore new ways to bring advantages to the U.S Army that Nanotechnology and MEMS devices offer." Preston Haney, the ARDEC co-Principal Investigator, added "The testing of the mPhase prototype nanobattery and magnetometer will help determine their applicability for the military in new fields like sensor networks and smart munitions."

"This agreement is a significant validation of our technology," said Ron Durando, president and CEO of mPhase Technologies. "We are looking forward to working with the US Army scientists to drive our technology into leading edge military applications."

Some of the possible uses for the mPhase magnetometer are perimeter security applications, and navigation and "GPS denied" navigation applications. The potential military uses of the Smart Nanobattery include powering small electronics like sensors and potential power source for smart munitions.

Last spring, mPhase reported on initial tests at Picatinny. The company said that the structure of its prototype battery and magnetometer demonstrated extreme resiliency to shock and acceleration, surviving a test that subjected them to high acceleration at a g-Force of 12,000. (One g is equal to the pull of gravity at sea level.)

The test, which involved a shot out of an air-gun, indicated that the underlying nanostructure of the prototype power cell could withstand extreme shock if used in military applications. The prototype magnetometer similarly withstood the stress test. Those tests pave the way for developing small guided munitions.

Tell Us What You Think

Do you have a review, update or anything you would like to add to this news story?

Leave your feedback
Submit