Site Sponsors
  • Park Systems - Manufacturer of a complete range of AFM solutions
  • Strem Chemicals - Nanomaterials for R&D
  • Oxford Instruments Nanoanalysis - X-Max Large Area Analytical EDS SDD
Posted in | Nanoanalysis

Bruker Introduces Unique Bench-Top NMR Reader to Quantify Hyperpolarization

Published on September 11, 2008 at 4:12 PM

At the 2008 World Molecular Imaging Congress, Bruker BioSpin introduces HyperQuant(TM), a bench-top NMR reader for precisely quantifying both the magnetic hyperpolarization as well as the thermal polarization of a sample. The HyperQuant applies time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) spectroscopy, a technology similar to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Magnetic hyperpolarization promises to be a useful technique with potential to boost contrast in MRI and sensitivity in solid-state NMR. Hyperpolarization provides a means to increase the nuclear magnetic polarization by orders of magnitude compared to the thermal Boltzmann polarization. Today, hyperpolarization can be achieved by various mechanisms, including DNP (dynamic nuclear polarization) and parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP). Typically, carbon-13 labeled samples are utilized because of their preferential NMR properties.

The key applications requirement for Bruker BioSpin’s new HyperQuant is that the polarization enhancement factor needs to be determined very precisely. Therefore, it is crucial to quantify both the hyperpolarization and the thermal polarization on the very same sample. The proprietary HyperQuant utilizes a unique permanent magnet combined with an innovative probe design (patents applied for) and novel NMR pulse sequences to enable the quantification of the thermal polarization of 13C-labeled samples using volumes as low as 1 ml. In this manner, hyperpolarization enhancement factors can be obtained directly and with confidence on the sample of interest, without having to go via a separate calibration reference.

The new HyperQuant offers a complete easy-to-use turnkey solution for any researcher developing new MRI or NMR applications for hyperpolarization.

Tell Us What You Think

Do you have a review, update or anything you would like to add to this news story?

Leave your feedback
Submit