NanoInk Sells NLP 2000 Desktop Nanofabrication System to Institute of Photonics

Published on January 19, 2011 at 6:35 AM

NanoInk's® NanoFabrication Systems Division is pleased to announce that the Institute of Photonics at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, U.K., purchased an NLP 2000 to be used for applied photonics and nanophotonics.

NanoInk's NLP 2000 System is a desktop nanofabrication system that allows researchers to rapidly design and create custom engineered and functionalized surfaces on the micro and nanoscale, using Dip Pen Nanolithography® (DPN®) to transfer minute amounts of materials over a large, environmentally controlled work area. The Institute of Photonics plans to use the NLP 2000 specifically for the deposition of soft materials to existing structures to generate optical effects, color conversion and for laser fabrication.

Dr. Robert Stokes (left), from NanoInk and Dr. Nicholas Laurand (right), from the Institute of Photonics at the University of Strathclyde, look at a substrate being patterned using NanoInk's NLP 2000. The Institute of Photonics plans to use the NLP 2000 specifically for the deposition of soft materials to existing structures to generate optical effects, color conversion and for laser fabrication.

"We are excited by our initial results using the NLP 2000 in the deposition of optical materials and polymers. The patterning of soft materials using tip-based lithography builds strongly on our existing expertise and capabilities in microLED arrays. As an applications-focused research unit, we believe that many exciting research opportunities will stem from this technology," said Simon Andrews, business development manager for the Institute of Photonics. "We are also very encouraged by NanoInk's focus on supporting application development with a view towards future commercial exploitation."

"The ability of the NLP 2000 to generate patterns of optical materials on scales wavelength or sub-wavelength dimensions is clearly aligned with the strategy and capability of the Institute of Photonics," said Robert Marchmont, general manager of Europe, the Middle East and Africa, NanoInk. "With three of NanoInk's DPN systems installed in close proximity, and the strong collaboration between Professors Martin Dawson, Peter Skabara and Duncan Graham, the University of Strathclyde has developed into a key center of excellence for DPN in optical nanoscience."

NanoInk's NanoFabrication Systems Division brings sophisticated nanofabrication to the laboratory desktop in an easy to use and affordable setting.

Source: http://www.nanoink.net/

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