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Posted in | MEMS - NEMS | Nanobusiness

Case University Student Receives Keithley Graduate Fellowship Award for Research on Nanoscale Devices

Published on March 22, 2012 at 2:49 AM

By Cameron Chai

Tina He, a Ph.D. student of the Case Western Reserve University, has received the first annual Keithley Graduate Fellowship Award from Keithley Instruments, a provider of sophisticated electrical test tools and systems, for her research work on advanced nanoscale devices and circuits.

Tina together with Philip Feng, a Professor at the Case Western Reserve University’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, has been developing ultrafast NEMS arrays and devices, and NEMS logic building blocks and circuits for sophisticated test and measurement applications. Their experimental work includes low-noise electronic measurement and nanodevice fabrication and will be strengthened by innovative designs and modeling.

The Keithley Graduate Fellowship Award was introduced to support Ph.D. students involved in advanced electrical measurements technology research at universities in the Cleveland region. Keithley Instruments’ President Linda Rae commented that the company is happy to present the first Keithley Graduate Fellowship Award to Tina, whose research experience as well as her research team’s knowledge in NEMS are in line with the company’s research and development activities and commitment towards promising nanotechnology applications.

Feng remarked that the award is a great honor for Tina and the research team at the Case Western Reserve University. Keithley Instruments’ generous support will be helpful for Ph.D. students to pursue advanced experimental research at the frontiers between electronics metrology and nanotechnology. This award is a significant achievement for Tina, who has shown a great interest to probe new devices, to conduct electronic experiments, and to develop measurement science and instruments.

Source: http://www.keithley.com/

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