Site Sponsors
  • Oxford Instruments Nanoanalysis - X-Max Large Area Analytical EDS SDD
  • Strem Chemicals - Nanomaterials for R&D
  • Park Systems - Manufacturer of a complete range of AFM solutions
Posted in | Nanomedicine

There is 1 related live offer.

Save 25% on magneTherm

BIND Biosciences to Share Developments in Medicinal Nanoengineering Platform at Scientific Conferences

Published on March 7, 2013 at 6:54 AM

BIND Biosciences, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing a new class of highly selective targeted and programmable therapeutics called AccurinsTM, today announced presentations at two upcoming scientific conferences:

  • Nanomedicines Alliance Industry Symposium, March 6-7, 2013, Rockville, MD
    • BIND will provide an oral presentation entitled “Managing Scale-up Challenges for Nanomedicines” in a session discussing Nanomedicine Chemistry Manufacturing and Controls.
  • Nanotech Conference 2013, May 12-16, 2013, Washington, DC
    • BIND will provide an oral presentation entitled “Accurins: Next Generation Targeted Cancer Therapeutics” in a session discussing Cancer Nanotechnology.

“BIND is recognized as a leader in the design and optimization of targeted therapeutics with precisely controlled physicochemical and pharmacological properties,” said Jeff Hrkach, Ph.D. Sr. Vice President, Technology, Research and Development of BIND. “We look forward to sharing with scientific and medical experts the progress we have made with our proprietary Medicinal Nanoengineering® platform which has led to the development of a pipeline of Accurins, including our lead product, BIND-014, currently entering Phase 2 clinical studies in oncology.”

About Accurins™

BIND Biosciences is discovering and developing Accurins, proprietary new best-in-class therapeutics with superior target selectivity and the potential to improve patient outcomes. Leveraging its proprietary Medicinal Nanoengineering® platform, BIND develops Accurins that outperform conventional drugs by selectively accumulating in diseased tissues and cells. The result is higher drug concentrations at the site of action with minimal off-target exposure, leading to markedly better efficacy and safety.

Source: http://www.bindbio.com/

Tell Us What You Think

Do you have a review, update or anything you would like to add to this news story?

Leave your feedback
Submit