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Posted in | Nanomaterials | Graphene

University of Manchester Graphene Researcher Wins Josh Award

Published on April 5, 2013 at 5:17 AM

A University of Manchester graphene researcher and lecturer who has encouraged more than 20,000 people to learn about the amazing potential of the wonder material has won this year’s Joshua Phillips Award for Innovation in Science Engagement (Josh Award) at MOSI (Museum of Science & Industry, Manchester).

Dr. Aravind Vijayaraghavan

As part of the award Dr Aravind Vijayaraghavan from The University of Manchester’s School of Computer Science, will be this year’s Science Communicator in Residence at the Manchester Science Festival.

Graphene, the world’s strongest, thinnest and most conductive material, is expected to revolutionise products of the future. From ultra-fast transistors, to better medical imaging, or even as a replacement for silicon in computers, Aravind’s work to promote the importance of graphene to school children and adults helps place Manchester at the forefront of this internationally important innovation, and encourages more people to choose careers which support its development here in the UK.

The University of Manchester is building the £61m National Graphene Institute, which will see scientists working alongside industry to help develop future applications.

Aravind uses simple hands-on activities, games, models and videos to explain how Nobel-Prize-winning laureates Professor Andre Geim and Professor Kostya Novoselov first managed to isolate the single atomic layers of graphite – known as graphene. Aravind is working to develop a visually engaging project for the Festival that aims to inspire visitors about the unique and beautiful structures of graphene and other polymers.

Manchester Science Festival director Marieke Navin said: “I’m delighted to welcome Aravind as our Science Communicator in residence at Manchester Science Festival. Graphene is the innovation of the moment and Aravind’s imaginative and energetic approach to science communication has helped thousands of people to understand its importance and relevance to our lives.”

Aravind said: “The development of graphene could change the way we think about everything from personal electronics to medicine. Through my public engagement work, I hope to inspire more people to pursue science education and careers, perhaps even a career in graphene technology, and to promote Manchester's role in this important development.”

The award, which includes a prize of up to £1000 to spend on a project and a one-off trophy, aims to encourage science communicators in the early stages of their careers to come up with imaginative ideas which inspire people of all ages about science.

Previous winners for the Josh Award including Steve Cross from UCL, instigator of Bright Club and Science Showoff and Stand-Up Mathematician Matt Parker, who recently did the biggest calculation ever attempted on a computer made entirely of dominoes, at MOSI.

Manchester Science Festival is an annual nine day celebration of science and invites people to play, create and experiment with science through beautiful installations, immersive science experiences and more. Manchester Science Festival is proudly produced by MOSI.

For more information see www.manchestersciencefestival.com

Source: http://www.manchester.ac.uk

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