New Market Report on Femtosecond Lasers for Cataract Surgery

Published on July 26, 2013 at 7:00 AM

Cataract surgery lasers markets at $572 million in 2012 are anticipated to reach $1.1 billion by 2013 and forecast to reach $2.4 billion dollars by 2019.

Growth is a result of new competitors in the market, demand for the laser technology by patients, and the market need by surgeons for greater accuracy in cataract surgery. This 2013 study, "Femtosecond Lasers for Cataract Surgery: Market Shares, Strategies, and Forecasts, Worldwide, Nanotechnology, 2013 to 2018" has 301 pages, 78 tables and figures. Worldwide markets are poised to achieve continuing growth as the aging population worldwide develops cataracts and need surgery. All older people develop cataracts, femtosecond lasers for cataract surgery improve the quality of the surgery in a dramatic manner.

Femtosecond laser technology for cataract surgery represents a paradigm shift. Surgeons approach cataract surgery with the ability to use automated process that is more reliable and more repeatable than manual techniques previously available. Alcon LenSx femtosecond lasers increase precision for key manual steps of the cataract surgery procedure.

This femtosecond laser cataract surgical system equipment makes it possible to deliver reproducible, predictable, and improved clinical outcomes for cataract surgery. Through image-guided visualization and micron-level laser precision, the surgeon has complete control over the surgery process. Femtosecond laser cataract surgical systems offer an improved patient safety profile.

Companies covered in this report include: 20/10 Perfect Vision AG, Abbott Laboratories, AISIN / IMRA Femtolite F / H Family, Bioptigen, Biovision, Calmar Laser, Novartis Group / Alcon, Ophtec Artisan R, OptiMedica, Raydiance, Staar Surgical, Valeant / Bausch & Lomb, WaveTec Vision and Zeiss.

Because of the simultaneous change in demographics and the introduction of automated process, ophthalmologists are facing an explosion in demand for their services the next 20 years. The aging of the baby boomers and the fact that patients older than 65 consume 10 times the eye care of patients younger than 65 creates unprecedented demand for cataract surgery.

Cataracts are a clouding of the eye's natural lens that impairs one's ability to see clearly. With two accommodating Intraocular Lens IOLs likely to be approved within the next 12 months, the premium market is again exciting.

Ultrasonic phacoemulsification, the standard of care in cataract removal equipment for four decades, has been in great part responsible for the safety and effectiveness of modern cataract surgery. It is certain to remain the dominant lens removal technology in the near term. A technology still in its infancy, laser-assisted cataract surgery using femtosecond lasers and picosecond lasers, promises to raise the standard of precision and safety to new heights. Numerous types, and styles of Intraocular Lenses (IOLs), varying in size, and attachment mechanisms compliment the introduction of the femtosecond laser cataract surgical systems.

Cataract procedures for eye care have improved in accuracy as femtosecond laser-assisted surgery is introduced. Precision, control, and efficacy of femtosecond lasers have exceeded manual incisional techniques faster than was anticipated.

Femtosecond lasers for cataract surgery market driving forces include the aging of the population. With age, all people have cataracts which can be cured with IOL. There is an ever-increasing baby boom aging population. There is a growing precision of cataract surgery. Safety of cataract surgical medical devices and lenses are primary market concerns. More advanced procedures are driving an increase in cataract surgery. Lower costs per surgery are driving an increase in cataract surgery.

Cataract surgical technology is evolving rapidly. Premium intraocular lenses (IOLs) introduced during the past decade and those still in the pipeline are raising patient's post-cataract visual expectations. Laser-assisted cataract surgery technology is gaining traction with clinicians. Surgeons are getting trained in the techniques needed to perform surgeries these new types of equipment. The motivation to learn the new surgical techniques is that the equipment comes with the promise of improved surgical precision.

Source: http://www.rnrmarketresearch.com/

Tell Us What You Think

Do you have a review, update or anything you would like to add to this news story?

Leave your feedback
Submit