Growing Tiny Carbon Nanotube Wires to Connect Computer Chips of the Future

Published on November 21, 2007 at 1:52 PM

Computers and electronic devices of the future will utilise technologies not currently available. An example of such a technology is the use of carbon nanotubes as interconnects for computer chips. This is now a step closer to reality with some new work from nanotechnology researchers within the Materials Ireland Polymer Research Centre at Trinity College Dublin.

Previous work to develop such junction structure nanotubes used various different methods but this study embraced chemical vapour deposition as it allows in situ patterning of these structures. The researchers, Rory W. Leahy, Emer Lahiff, Andrew I. Minett and Werner J. Blau used a simple method of growing controllable densities of interconnect type multiwall nanotubes with high proportions of Y-junction and multiple junction nanotubes across etched patterns, using a simple catalyst preparation.

Their research work has been released as part of a special edition of the open access journal, AZoJono*, and outlines a method for growing ordered arrays of interconnect type multi-walled nanotubes with the ability to fine tune the proportion of junction structures through control of initial conditions and processing parameters such as trench width and reaction temperature.

This special edition of AZoJono features a number of papers from DESYGN-IT, the project seeking to secure Europe as the international scientific leader in the design, synthesis, growth, characterisation and application of nanotubes, nanowires and nanotube arrays for industrial technology.

The complete article is available to view on AZoJono at http://www.azonano.com/Details.asp?ArticleID=2036

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*AZojono publishes high quality articles and papers on all aspects of nanomaterials and related technologies. All the contributions are reviewed by a world class panel of editors who are experts in a wide spectrum of materials science. [See http://www.azonano.com/founding_editors.asp]

AZojono is based on the patented OARS (Open Access Rewards System) publishing protocol. The OARS protocol represents a unique development in the field of scientific publishing – the distribution of online scientific journal revenue between the authors, peer reviewers and site operators with no publication charges, just totally free to access high quality, peer reviewed materials science. [See http://www.azonano.com/nanotechnology%20journal.asp and http://www.azonano.com/journal_of_nanotechnology.asp]

Members of DESYGN-IT are Trinity College Dublin, National University of Ireland Cork, Jozef Stefan Institute, University of Ulster, Queen Mary and Westfield College, Queen University Belfast, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft, University of Cambridge, Toughglass, Sensor Technology & Devices, Mid Sweden University, Ntera, Mo6 and University of Latvia.

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