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Another Type of Nanotube - A How to Guide for Making Bamboo Structured Carbon Nanotubes

Published on November 21, 2007 at 2:04 PM

Nanotechnology is area if science that has recently captured the attention of people all around the world. At the heart of the nanotechnology revolution are carbon nanotubes, amazing materials with astonishing properties. They have applications in most fields, with new possibilities emerging regularly.

Carbon nanotubes are not as straightforward as many believe them to be. Of course there are the simple single walled carbon nanotubes and the more complex multi walled carbon nanotubes, but there are also carbon nanotubes in a number of other forms. By altering reaction conditions, carbon nanotubes also exist as carbon cages, carbon nanohorns and carbon nanotubes with a structure reminiscent of bamboo.

Research work has just been released that provides a detailed analysis of the procedure for synthesising bamboo structured carbon nanotubes (BCNTs). The work by Zhonglai Li, Hongzhe Zhang, Joe Tobin, Michael A. Morris, Jieshan Qiu, Gary Attard and Justin D. Holmes from University College Cork, Dalian University of Technology and Cardiff University has been published in a special edition of the open access journal, AZoJono*.

This special edition of AZoJono features a number of papers from DESYGN-IT, the project seeking to secure Europe as the international scientific leader in the design, synthesis, growth, characterisation and application of nanotubes, nanowires and nanotube arrays for industrial technology.

The present work looked at bamboo-structured carbon nanotubes with a narrow diameter distribution synthesized on bimetallic copper-molybdenum catalysts. Findings included the catalytic nanoparticles playing a key role in the synthesis of the nanotubes as well as acting as nucleation seeds for growth. Raman and thermal gravimetric analysis results showed that the quality of the BCNTs was dependent on the amount of copper present in the catalyst. These results challenge accepted wisdom that significant yields of CNTs can only be formed from catalytic CVD routes if first row or mid-row transition elements are used as catalysts.

The article is available to view in its entirety on AZoJono at http://www.azonano.com/Details.asp?ArticleID=2037

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*AZojono publishes high quality articles and papers on all aspects of nanomaterials and related technologies. All the contributions are reviewed by a world class panel of editors who are experts in a wide spectrum of materials science. [See http://www.azonano.com/founding_editors.asp]

AZojono is based on the patented OARS (Open Access Rewards System) publishing protocol. The OARS protocol represents a unique development in the field of scientific publishing – the distribution of online scientific journal revenue between the authors, peer reviewers and site operators with no publication charges, just totally free to access high quality, peer reviewed materials science. [See http://www.azonano.com/nanotechnology%20journal.asp and http://www.azonano.com/journal_of_nanotechnology.asp]

Members of DESYGN-IT are Trinity College Dublin, National University of Ireland Cork, Jozef Stefan Institute, University of Ulster, Queen Mary and Westfield College, Queen University Belfast, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft, University of Cambridge, Toughglass, Sensor Technology & Devices, Mid Sweden University, Ntera, Mo6 and University of Latvia.

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