Inspecting the Surface Finish of Wood Flooring Using a Profilometer

In various industries, the purpose of a wood finish is to protect the surface from various types of damage such as chemical, mechanical or biological and/or provide a specifi­c visual aesthetic.

Quantifying surface characteristics of their wood fi­nishes is important to both manufacturers and buyers, and can play a significant part in the quality control or optimization of ­finishing processes for wood. This article will explore the various surface features that can be quanti­fied using a Nanovea 3D Non-Contact Profilometer.

Importance of Profi­ling Wood Finishes

All wood surfaces possess a measure of roughness and texture, and it can is essential to be able to quantify this in order to ensure it can meet the requirements of its application. Optimizing the finishing process or determining the quality of wooden surfaces based on a quantifi­able, repeatable and reliable surface inspection method would let manufacturers design and implement new controlled surface treatments and give buyers the ability to inspect and select suitable wood materials.

Nanovea HS2000

High Speed Inspection and Precision Flatness Measure

Advanced Automation

Customizable Options

High Speed

Precision Flatness Measurement

Rigid and Stable Structure

Measurement Objectives

This study used the high-speed Nanovea HS2000 platform equipped with a non-contact profi­ling line sensor to analyze and compare the surface fi­nish of three separate flooring samples: Antique Birch Hardwood, Courtship Grey Oak, and Santos Mahogany flooring. This showcased for the capability of the Nanovea Non-Contact Profi­lometer to deliver both speed and precision when measuring different examples of surface areas and comprehensive in-depth analysis of the scans.

Measurement Parameters

Table 1: Test parameters for individual pro_lometry measurements on Antique Birch Hardwood, Courtship Grey Oak and Santos Mahogany wood samples.

Test Parameter Value
Instrument HS2000
Optical Sensor LS1
Optical Sensor Height Range (μm) 200
Scan size (mm) 100 mm x 80 mm
Step size (μm) 100 μm x 10 μm
Scan time (h:m:s) 00:05:94

 

Samples Tested

Samples of wood tested

Samples of wood tested

Results

Sample Description

The Courtship Grey Oak and Santos Mahogany samples are laminate flooring types. Courtship Grey Oak is a low gloss, textured slate gray color with an EIR fi­nish. Santos Mahogany is a high gloss, dark burgundy sample that was pre­finished. Antique Birch Hardwood has an aluminum oxide ­finish, consisting of 7 layers to provide everyday wear and tear protection.

The individual scans of the three flooring sample can be observed below.

False color view of A) Antique Birch Hardwood B) Courtship Grey Oak C) Santos Mahogany (left to right)

Figure 1: False color view of A) Antique Birch Hardwood B) Courtship Grey Oak C) Santos Mahogany (left to right)

Antique Birch Hardwood

3D view for Sample Antique Birch Hardwood

Figure 3: 3D view for Sample Antique Birch Hardwood

Pro_le extraction and height parameters for Sample Antique Birch Hardwood

Pro_le extraction and height parameters for Sample Antique Birch Hardwood

Figure 4: Pro_le extraction and height parameters for Sample Antique Birch Hardwood

Courtship Grey Oak

3D view for Sample Courtship Grey Oak

Figure 6: 3D view for Sample Courtship Grey Oak

Pro_le extraction and height parameters for Courtship Grey Oak

Pro_le extraction and height parameters for Courtship Grey Oak

Figure 7: Pro_le extraction and height parameters for Courtship Grey Oak

Figure 8: Slices Analysis for Sample Courtship Grey Oak

Santos Mahogany

3D view for Sample Santos Mahogany

Figure 10: 3D view for Sample Santos Mahogany

Pro_le extraction and height parameters for Sample Santos Mahogany

Pro_le extraction and height parameters for Sample Santos Mahogany

Figure 11: Pro_le extraction and height parameters for Sample Santos Mahogany

Discussion

There is a clear distinction between all the samples’ Sa value. The lowest Sa value, and therefore the smoothest material, was Antique Birch Hardwood with a Sa of 1.716 µm. This was followed by Santos Mahogany with a Sa of 2.388 µm, with the Courtship Grey Oak showing a significantly higher value with a Sa of 11.17 µm. Other common roughness values that are useful in assessing the roughness of specifi­c profi­les along the surface are P-values and R-values. The texture of the Courtship Grey Oak is coarse and has a large number of crack-like features along the wood’s cellular and ­fiber direction.

Additional analysis was done on the Courtship Grey Oak sample due to its textured surface. On the Courtship Grey Oak sample, slices were used to separate and calculate the depth and volume of the cracks from the flatter uniform surface.

Conclusion

This article has shown how the Nanovea HS2000 high speed pro­filometer can be used for the inspection of the surface ­finish of wood samples, and does so in an effective and efficient manner. Surface fi­nish measurements can be important to both manufacturers and consumers of hard wood flooring in understanding how they can improve a manufacturing process or choose the appropriate product that performs best for a particular application.

This information has been sourced, reviewed and adapted from materials provided by Nanovea.

For more information on this source, please visit Nanovea.

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