The Three Major Biomedical Applications of Gold Nanospheres

Advanced nanomaterials, such as gold nanospheres, have a promising future in high-tech biomedical applications. Gold nanospheres’ optoelectronic and physiochemical properties can be changed by altering their structure, size, and width-to-height ratio.

This article outlines the key biomedical applications of gold nanospheres, including therapeutic agents, drug and gene delivery, imaging, and nano biosensing.

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Gold Nanospheres in Sensing

Biosensing is one crucial use of gold nanospheres. Polymer chain reactions and enzyme-based assays are two standard but complicated and expensive techniques for sensing biomolecules. Gold nanospheres can be used to successfully examine a wide range of illnesses, including cancer, kidney failure, UTI, and cardiac arrest.

Gold nanospheres are also frequently used in optical sensing, colorimetry, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The detection of DNA/RNA nucleotides and the antisense RNAs that can be used to identify DNA strand alterations have been made possible by using gold nanospheres in contemporary applications.

Gold nanospheres are used to boost the susceptibility of Raman-based biosensors as they improve Raman signals. Even at incredibly low parts per billion concentrations, biomolecules can be detected using Raman sensors.

The increased sensitivity of biosensors simplifies early disease diagnosis. Gold nanospheres are also used in sol particle immunoassay in pregnancy tests and to detect hepatitis B.

Gold Nanospheres for Imaging

Low toxicity, excellent biocompatibility, simplicity in production, and minimal contact with biological components are all characteristics of gold nanospheres. Their use in photoacoustic, fluorescence, X-Ray computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance, and darkfield microscopic imaging is therefore promising.

As CT helps in 3D visual reconstruction and tissue bisection, X-Ray computed tomography is a cost-effective approach for tissue imaging. The functioning of CT is founded on the variation in density between healthy and diseased tissues, which contrasting agents generate.

Gold nanospheres are now substituting traditionally used iodine as a contrasting agent due to their higher atomic number and electron density.

Gold nanoparticles are used in electron microscopy to detect biospecific interactions due to their high electron density. The identification of microscopic objects, such as living cells, is done using confocal laser microscopy (CLM).

Another popular imaging method for 3D anatomy is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Gold nanospheres are used in MRI to detect brain tumors in living mice.

Gold Nanospheres as Therapeutics

The treatment of drugs, genetic regulation, and photothermal therapy all use gold nanospheres. They work to treat rheumatic conditions. Arthritis, muscular dystrophy, and anemia are treated with “Swarna bhasma,” a gold powder made in India with nanometer-sized particles. In addition to being used to restore teeth, gold nanospheres are also used to cure syphilis and mental illnesses.

Gold nanospheres are an efficient means to deliver genes due to their low toxicity, simplicity in surface attachment, and availability of numerous attachment sites. They can be employed as carriers for delivering DNA molecules and antisense RNA and as magnetic field-guided drug deliverers.

Gold nanospheres have remarkable cell affinity, and immune cells quickly absorb them. They can be applied to targeted photothermal cancer therapy to destroy diseased cells while sparing healthy ones.

Gold nanospheres also prevent drug resistance cells that could otherwise be life-threatening. By creating transfection agents, gold nanoparticles are employed in gene therapy to cure potential diseases.

They can control protein expression and prevent cells from expressing luciferase. By preventing the generation of reactive oxygen species, the gold nanospheres also function as antioxidant agents.

References

  1. A. Giljohann et al. Angew Chem Int Ed Engl. 2010; 49(19):3280-94. doi: 10.1002/anie.200904359
  2. Hu et al. Front. Bioeng. Biotechnol. 2020;8:990. doi:10.3389/fbioe.2020.00990
  3. A. Dykman et al. Acta Naturae. 2011;3(2):34.
  4. Yi-C. Yeh et al. 2012;4(6):1871.
  5. A. Bansal et al. Nanoscale Adv. 2020;2:3764.

This information has been sourced, reviewed, and adapted from materials provided by Nikalyte Ltd.

For more information on this source, please visit Nikalyte Ltd.

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