Ytterbium Fluoride (YbF3) Nanoparticles – Properties, Applications

Topics Covered

Introduction
Chemical Properties
Physical Properties
Thermal Properties
Applications

Introduction

Nanoparticles research has been providing innovative solutions in the field of biomedicine, cosmetics and electronics which may not have been possible by using the basic elements in their original states. This article will elaborate on the properties and applications of ytterbium fluoride nanoparticles.

Ytterbium fluoride (YbF3) nanoparticles are a source of ytterbium that is insoluble in water. It is available in submicron, ultra high purity and nanopowder forms. The other names by which ytterbium fluoride is known are ytterbium trifluoride and trifluoroytterbium.

Ytterbium belongs to the F Block, Period 6 and fluorine belongs to Block P, Period 2 of the periodic table. Safety information to be noted about these particles is that they are harmful if inhaled and if they come in contact with skin or eyes.

Chemical Properties

The following tables list the chemical properties of ytterbium fluoride.

Chemical Data
Chemical symbol YbF3
CAS No 13860-80-0
Group Ytterbium n/a
Fluorine 17
Electronic configuration Ytterbium [Xe] 4f14 6s2
Fluorine [He] 2s2 2p5
Chemical Composition
Element Content (%)
Ytterbium 74.9
Fluorine 24.55

Physical Properties

Ytterbium fluoride nanoparticles appear in the form of white crystals with a nearly spherical morphology. The table below lists the physical properties of these nanoparticles.

Properties Metric Imperial
Density 8.20 g/cm3 0.296 lb/in3
Molar Mass 230.934 g/mol -

Thermal Properties

The thermal properties of ytterbium fluoride are as per the table below:-

Properties Metric Imperial
Melting Point 1052° C 1926° F
Boiling Point 2380° C 4316° F

Applications

Some of the chief applications of ytterbium fluoride are as below:

  • Production of metals as they have an affinity to oxygen
  • Oil refining, pharmaceuticals and synthetic organic chemicals
  • Alloying of metals
  • Optical deposition
  • Fiber optics, lasing and fiber amplifying applications
  • In silicon cells for the conversion of radiation to electricity.

Source: AZoNano

 

Date Added: Apr 12, 2013 | Updated: Jul 10, 2013
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