Posted in | Nanomedicine

NanoLogix’ Test Kits Detect Group B Strep in Pregnant Women

Published on August 10, 2011 at 3:26 AM

By Cameron Chai

NanoLogix, a biotechnology company focusing on quick identification and detection of living microorganisms, has declared that a peer-reviewed paper from the University of Texas Health Science Center has been published by the American Journal of Perinatology certifying that BioNanoFilter (BNF) and NanoLogix BioNanoPore (BNP) Quick Test technology can identify and detect Group B Strep (GBS) within 4 to 6 hours of time.

The NanoLogix diagnostic methods were proved to detect GBS about 12 to 18 times quicker than conventional methods which generally need 2 to 3 days of incubation to obtain the same results.

As per the findings of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), about 25% of pregnant women may have the chances to get Group B Strep. If antibiotics are not induced into colonized mothers before delivery, the newborn baby may receive the bacteria from the mother that may result in dangerous blood infections including stillbirth, pneumonia, sepsis, or meningitis. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the U.S. CDC suggested that all pregnant women globally must be tested between 35 and 37 weeks for GBS detection.

NanoLogix’ rapid diagnostic tests will favor pregnant women who are at risk for GBS colonization during delivery. Since the results can be obtained within 4 hours utilizing NanoLogix test kits, doctors can make the decision early regarding the administration of bacteria-specific antibiotics to the mother. The over dosage of broad-spectrum antibiotics that leads to antibiotic resistance problems can be reduced through this innovation.

The study for GBS identification and detection validated both Nanologix BNF and BNP Quick Test kits. These easy-to-use kits need little bit of training and few devices apart from an incubator. This enables the tests to be performed in remote places with less personnel and resources. In addition, the tests can be carried out on a single sample which proves expensive for PCR-related techniques.

Source: http://www.nanologix.com/

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