Titanium Nitride (TiN) Nanoparticles - Properties, Applications

Topics Covered

Introduction
Chemical Properties
Physical Properties
Thermal Properties
Applications

Introduction

Nanoparticle research has become an area of interest to scientists due to the unexpected results produced by altering the atomic and molecular properties of elements. This article deals with the properties and applications of titanium nitride nanoparticles.

Titanium nitride (TiN) is available in coated, dispersed, high and ultra high purity forms. Their high hardness, high temperature chemical stability, high melting point, infrared absorption and UV shielding find a number of useful applications. Titanium belongs to Block D, Period 4 while nitrogen belongs to Block P, Period 2 of the periodic table. Some of the alternate names of titanium nitride are tinite, nitridotitanium and azanylidynetitanium. It is important to maintain dryness while storing these nanoparticles and also avoid any stress on them.

Chemical Properties

The following tables list the chemical properties of titanium nitride.

Chemical Data
Chemical symbol TiN
CAS No 25583-20-4
Group Titanium 4
Nitrogen 15
Electronic configuration Titanium [Ar] 3d2 4s2
Nitrogen [He] 2s2 2p3
Chemical Composition
Element Content (%)
Titanium 77.5
Nitrogen 22.6

Physical Properties

Titanium nitride nanoparticles appear in the form of a brown powder having a spherical surface area. The table below provides the physical properties of these nanoparticles.

Properties Metric Imperial
Density 5.24 g/cm3 0.189 lb/in3
Molar Mass 61.87 g/mol -

Thermal Properties

The thermal properties of titanium nitride nanoparticles are as below.

Properties Metric Imperial
Melting Point 2950°C 5342° F

Applications

Given below are some of the chief applications of titanium nitride.

  • Making of plastic packaging materials like PET bottles
  • In solar vacuum tube, due to high absorption of sunlight
  • High temperature furnaces for energy consumption
  • Making of artificial limbs, biological materials
  • Making optical devices in harsh environments
  • Used as alloy modificators in cemented carbides.

Source: AZoNano

Date Added: Apr 12, 2013 | Updated: Jul 11, 2013
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