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Electron Cryo-Microscopy Offers Extraordinary Details of Proteasome Complex

Electron Cryo-Microscopy Offers Extraordinary Details of Proteasome Complex

Scientists have pioneered the use of a high-powered imaging technique to picture in exquisite detail one of the central proteins of life - a cellular recycling unit with a role in many diseases. [More]
Stable JILA Microscope Can Accurately Track DNA Molecules for Many Hours

Stable JILA Microscope Can Accurately Track DNA Molecules for Many Hours

JILA researchers have designed a microscope instrument so stable that it can accurately measure the 3D movement of individual molecules over many hours--hundreds of times longer than the current limit measured in seconds. [More]
Cutting-Edge 3D Microscopy Helps Discover Thick Band of Microtubules in Certain Retina Neurons

Cutting-Edge 3D Microscopy Helps Discover Thick Band of Microtubules in Certain Retina Neurons

Researchers have discovered a thick band of microtubules in certain neurons in the retina that they believe acts as a transport road for mitochondria that help provide energy required for visual processing. The findings appear in the July issue of The Journal of General Physiology. [More]
Rice University's FEI Titan Themis Scanning/Transmission Electron Microscope Enables Analysis of Subnanoscale Materials

Rice University's FEI Titan Themis Scanning/Transmission Electron Microscope Enables Analysis of Subnanoscale Materials

Rice University, renowned for nanoscale science, has installed microscopes that will allow researchers to peer deeper than ever into the fabric of the universe. [More]
New International Electron Microscopy Demonstration and Application Facility for Quorum

New International Electron Microscopy Demonstration and Application Facility for Quorum

The 11th June saw the formal opening of a new state-of-the-art cryo scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and analysis suite at the Quorum headquarters in Laughton, East Sussex. [More]
UZH Research Team Discovers "Molecular Gate" Inside Nuclear Pores Using High-Performance Microscope

UZH Research Team Discovers "Molecular Gate" Inside Nuclear Pores Using High-Performance Microscope

An active exchange takes place between the cell nucleus and the cytoplasm: Molecules are transported into the nucleus or from the nucleus into the cytoplasm. In a human cell, more than a million molecules are transported into the cell nucleus every minute. [More]
New Microscope to Study Optical Properties of Individual Nanoparticles

New Microscope to Study Optical Properties of Individual Nanoparticles

Nanomaterials play an essential role in many areas of daily life. There is thus a large interest to gain detailed knowledge about their optical and electronic properties. Conventional microscopes get beyond their limits when particle size falls to the range of a few ten nanometers where a single particle provides only a vanishingly small signal. [More]
New Method to See Inside Supercapacitors at the Atomic Level

New Method to See Inside Supercapacitors at the Atomic Level

Researchers from the University of Cambridge, together with French collaborators based in Toulouse, have developed a new method to see inside battery-like devices known as supercapacitors at the atomic level. The new method could be used in order to optimise and improve the devices for real-world applications, including electric cars, where they can be used alongside batteries to enhance a vehicle’s performance. [More]
Nanoscale Structure of Hairs Help Saharan Silver Ants to Survive Scorching Heat

Nanoscale Structure of Hairs Help Saharan Silver Ants to Survive Scorching Heat

The tiny hairs of Saharan silver ants possess crucial adaptive features that allow the ants to regulate their body temperatures and survive the scorching hot conditions of their desert habitat. [More]
New Technique Uses Light and a Computer to Create Digital Pictures of a Tissue’s Chemical Composition

New Technique Uses Light and a Computer to Create Digital Pictures of a Tissue’s Chemical Composition

An NIBIB-funded researcher has developed a new technique that creates digital pictures of a tissue’s chemical composition using light and a computer. The technique replaces the need for dyes or stains, which can be costly and require significant time and effort to apply. [More]