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Researchers Begin to Design Framework for Emerging Field of Nanoinformatics

Researchers Begin to Design Framework for Emerging Field of Nanoinformatics

In two new studies, researchers from across the country spearheaded by Duke University faculty have begun to design the framework on which to build the emerging field of nanoinformatics. [More]
Nano-C Granted EPA Approval to Manufacture, Sell Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

Nano-C Granted EPA Approval to Manufacture, Sell Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

Nano-C, Inc. received clearance from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to manufacture and sell Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT) for a wide range of applications. [More]
NIST Launches New nano-EHS Protocol Website

NIST Launches New nano-EHS Protocol Website

As engineered nanomaterials increasingly find their way into commercial products, researchers who study the potential environmental or health impacts of those materials face a growing challenge to accurately measure and characterize them. These challenges affect measurements of basic chemical and physical properties as well as toxicology assessments. [More]
Research on Environmental Impact of Nanoparticle Usage in Agriculture Honored with Agilent Thought Leader Award

Research on Environmental Impact of Nanoparticle Usage in Agriculture Honored with Agilent Thought Leader Award

Agilent Technologies Inc. today announced that Dr. Arturo Keller has received an Agilent Thought Leader Award in support of his research on the use of nanoparticles in agriculture and the environmental consequences. [More]
Study on Role of Ingested Nanoparticles in Physiology, Function of Gut and Gut Microbiome

Study on Role of Ingested Nanoparticles in Physiology, Function of Gut and Gut Microbiome

Researchers at Binghamton University believe understanding nano particles’ ability to influence our metabolic processing may be integral to mediating metabolic disorders and obesity, both of which are on the rise and have been linked to processed foods. [More]
Nano Health & Safety Consortium Launched by SUNY Poly CNSE and NIOSH

Nano Health & Safety Consortium Launched by SUNY Poly CNSE and NIOSH

As a testament to Governor Andrew Cuomo’s pioneering leadership in establishing New York State’s global prominence in nanoelectronics research and development and commercialization, SUNY Polytechnic Institute’s Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (SUNY Poly CNSE) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) today announced the launch of the Nano Health & Safety Consortium (NHSC). [More]
New Book on Marine Litter Focuses on Impact of Nano-Plastic Fragments

New Book on Marine Litter Focuses on Impact of Nano-Plastic Fragments

University of Exeter researcher, Professor Tamara Galloway, has contributed to one of the most expansive summaries of our knowledge of man-made litter in the world's oceans to date. The new book, Marine Anthropogenic Litter is published by Springer and is set to be available through open access, allowing its content to reach the wider audience that is so necessary to raise awareness of this important challenge. [More]
Cellulose Nanofibres Not Harmful Says Study

Cellulose Nanofibres Not Harmful Says Study

Plant-based cellulose nanofibres do not pose a short-term health risk, especially short fibres, shows a study conducted in the context of National Research Programme "Opportunities and Risks of Nanomaterials" (NRP 64). But lung cells are less efficient in eliminating longer fibres. [More]
EPSRC Grants £678,000 for Project on Radiation Damage in Nanoporous Nuclear Materials

EPSRC Grants £678,000 for Project on Radiation Damage in Nanoporous Nuclear Materials

SCIENTISTS are investigating the use of man-made sponge-like materials as a new way of solving important engineering challenges for future generations of nuclear reactors, such as the accumulation of gas, which can lead to structural weakness. Now, a research project at the University of Huddersfield has been awarded major funding to explore the possibilities. [More]
Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Could Affect Colon Gut Microbiota

Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Could Affect Colon Gut Microbiota

Exposure of a model human colon to metal oxide nanoparticles, at levels that could be present in foods, consumer goods, or treated drinking water, led to multiple, measurable differences in the normal microbial community that inhabits the human gut. The changes observed in microbial metabolism and the gut microenvironment with exposure to nanoparticles could have implications for overall human health, as discussed in an article published in Environmental Engineering Science, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Environmental Engineering Science website until June 1, 2015. [More]