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Nano Health & Safety Consortium Launched by SUNY Poly CNSE and NIOSH

Nano Health & Safety Consortium Launched by SUNY Poly CNSE and NIOSH

As a testament to Governor Andrew Cuomo’s pioneering leadership in establishing New York State’s global prominence in nanoelectronics research and development and commercialization, SUNY Polytechnic Institute’s Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (SUNY Poly CNSE) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) today announced the launch of the Nano Health & Safety Consortium (NHSC). [More]
New Book on Marine Litter Focuses on Impact of Nano-Plastic Fragments

New Book on Marine Litter Focuses on Impact of Nano-Plastic Fragments

University of Exeter researcher, Professor Tamara Galloway, has contributed to one of the most expansive summaries of our knowledge of man-made litter in the world's oceans to date. The new book, Marine Anthropogenic Litter is published by Springer and is set to be available through open access, allowing its content to reach the wider audience that is so necessary to raise awareness of this important challenge. [More]
Cellulose Nanofibres Not Harmful Says Study

Cellulose Nanofibres Not Harmful Says Study

Plant-based cellulose nanofibres do not pose a short-term health risk, especially short fibres, shows a study conducted in the context of National Research Programme "Opportunities and Risks of Nanomaterials" (NRP 64). But lung cells are less efficient in eliminating longer fibres. [More]
EPSRC Grants £678,000 for Project on Radiation Damage in Nanoporous Nuclear Materials

EPSRC Grants £678,000 for Project on Radiation Damage in Nanoporous Nuclear Materials

SCIENTISTS are investigating the use of man-made sponge-like materials as a new way of solving important engineering challenges for future generations of nuclear reactors, such as the accumulation of gas, which can lead to structural weakness. Now, a research project at the University of Huddersfield has been awarded major funding to explore the possibilities. [More]
Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Could Affect Colon Gut Microbiota

Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Could Affect Colon Gut Microbiota

Exposure of a model human colon to metal oxide nanoparticles, at levels that could be present in foods, consumer goods, or treated drinking water, led to multiple, measurable differences in the normal microbial community that inhabits the human gut. The changes observed in microbial metabolism and the gut microenvironment with exposure to nanoparticles could have implications for overall human health, as discussed in an article published in Environmental Engineering Science, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Environmental Engineering Science website until June 1, 2015. [More]
NNI Publishes Report on Workshop to Assess Status of Nanotechnology EHS Risk Science

NNI Publishes Report on Workshop to Assess Status of Nanotechnology EHS Risk Science

The National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) today published the report from the workshop, "Stakeholder Perspectives on Perception, Assessment, and Management of the Potential Risks of Nanotechnology" (R3 Workshop), which was held September 10-11, 2013, in Washington, D.C. [More]
Study Analyzes Ability of Typical Water Pretreatment Methods to Remove Engineered Nanoparticles

Study Analyzes Ability of Typical Water Pretreatment Methods to Remove Engineered Nanoparticles

The increased use of engineered nanoparticles (ENMs) in commercial and industrial applications is raising concern over the environmental and health effects of nanoparticles released into the water supply. A timely study that analyzes the ability of typical water pretreatment methods to remove titanium dioxide, the most commonly used ENM, is published in Environmental Engineering Science, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Environmental Engineering Science website until April 10, 2015. [More]
Discrepancies in Toxicology Studies of Cellulose Nanocrystals

Discrepancies in Toxicology Studies of Cellulose Nanocrystals

Are cellulose nanocrystals harmful to human health? The answer might depend on the route of exposure, according to a review of the literature by a Virginia Tech scientist, but there have been few studies and many questions remain. [More]
Dunkin' Brands Agrees for Removal of Nanomaterials from Powdered Donuts

Dunkin' Brands Agrees for Removal of Nanomaterials from Powdered Donuts

Dunkin' Brands, the parent company of the Dunkin' Donuts chain, has agreed to remove titanium dioxide, a whitening agent that is commonly a source of nanomaterials, from all powdered sugar used to make the company's donuts. As a result of this progress, the advocacy group As You Sow has withdrawn a shareholder proposal asking Dunkin' to assess and reduce the risks of using nanomaterials in its food products. [More]
NIST Issues New Silver Nanoparticle Reference Material for Studying Associated Environmental, Health and Safety Risks

NIST Issues New Silver Nanoparticle Reference Material for Studying Associated Environmental, Health and Safety Risks

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has issued a new silver nanoparticle reference material to support researchers studying potential environmental, health and safety risks associated with the nanoparticles, which are being incorporated in a growing number of consumer and industrial products for their antimicrobial properties. The new NIST test material is believed to be the first of its kind to stabilize the highly reactive silver particles in a freeze-dried, polymer coated, nanoparticle cake for long-term storage. [More]
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