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Latest Insights on Cellulose Nanocrystal Toxicity

Latest Insights on Cellulose Nanocrystal Toxicity

Novel nanomaterials derived from cellulose have many promising industrial applications, are biobased and biodegradable, and can be produced at relatively low cost. Their potential toxicity--whether ingested, inhaled, on contact with the skin, or on exposure to cells within the body--is a topic of intense discussion, and the latest evidence and insights on cellulose nanocrystal toxicity are presented in a Review article in Industrial Biotechnology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available on the Industrial Biotechnology website. [More]
Antimicrobial Silver Nanoparticles Induce Stress in the Endoplasmic Reticulum, Demonstrating Nanotoxicity

Antimicrobial Silver Nanoparticles Induce Stress in the Endoplasmic Reticulum, Demonstrating Nanotoxicity

Whereas resistance to antibiotics complicates certain treatments, antimicrobial silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are gaining popularity for medical use. These particles are toxic for certain bacteria, but what about for humans? Researchers at INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier Research Centre have taken a step toward understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that affect these particles. [More]
Lowly Roundworm Helps Measure Toxicity of Nanoparticles

Lowly Roundworm Helps Measure Toxicity of Nanoparticles

The lowly roundworm is the star of an ambitious Rice University project to measure the toxicity of nanoparticles. [More]
Novel Best Practice Guide for Safe Use of Nanoparticles in Packaging Industries

Novel Best Practice Guide for Safe Use of Nanoparticles in Packaging Industries

A novel “Best Practice Guide for the Safe Handling and Use of Nanoparticles in Packaging Industries” is now available to support those working with nanomaterials at all stages in the development of packaging products. [More]
Exposure to Nanoparticles May Increase Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases

Exposure to Nanoparticles May Increase Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases

Nanoparticles, extremely tiny particles measured in billionths of a meter, are increasingly everywhere, and especially in biomedical products. Their toxicity has been researched in general terms, but now a team of Israeli scientists has for the first time found that exposure nanoparticles (NPs) of silicon dioxide (SiO2) can play a major role in the development of cardiovascular diseases when the NP cross tissue and cellular barriers and also find their way into the circulatory system. [More]
Empa Issues LICARA Guidelines for Sustainable Competitiveness of Nanoproducts

Empa Issues LICARA Guidelines for Sustainable Competitiveness of Nanoproducts

The LICARA guidelines are geared towards small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) from all branches of industry, and help weigh up the pros and cons of nanomaterials and make decisions on their use. The guidelines also do their bit towards efficient communication in the value added chain. [More]
Nanotech in Foods Will Be Accepted Only if it Improves Safety, Enhances Nutrition

Nanotech in Foods Will Be Accepted Only if it Improves Safety, Enhances Nutrition

New research from North Carolina State University and the University of Minnesota shows that the majority of consumers will accept the presence of nanotechnology or genetic modification (GM) technology in foods – but only if the technology enhances the nutrition or improves the safety of the food. [More]
Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization Honors University of Houston Researcher with Emerging Investigator Award

Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization Honors University of Houston Researcher with Emerging Investigator Award

Debora Rodrigues, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Houston, has received the Emerging Investigator award from the Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization (SNO). [More]
Toxicologist Discovers Shortcomings in Studies on Risks Associated with Nanoparticles

Toxicologist Discovers Shortcomings in Studies on Risks Associated with Nanoparticles

Empa toxicologist Harald Krug has lambasted his colleagues in the journal Angewandte Chemie. He evaluated several thousand studies on the risks associated with nanoparticles and discovered no end of shortcomings: poorly prepared experiments and results that don’t carry any clout. Instead of merely leveling criticism, however, Empa is also developing new standards for such experiments within an international network. [More]
Plastic Nanoparticles Can Negatively Affect Organisms in Freshwater Bodies

Plastic Nanoparticles Can Negatively Affect Organisms in Freshwater Bodies

Organisms can be negatively affected by plastic nanoparticles, not just in the seas and oceans but in freshwater bodies too. These particles slow the growth of algae, cause deformities in water fleas and impede communication between small organisms and fish. These are the results of research carried out by Wageningen University and IMARES, part of Wageningen UR, published in the latest issue of Environmental Science and Technology. It is the first time that such effects of plastic on freshwater organisms have been studied. [More]
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