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New Computer Programming Language to Automate Lab-on-a-Chip Technologies used in DNA Sequencing

New Computer Programming Language to Automate Lab-on-a-Chip Technologies used in DNA Sequencing

A research team at the University of California, Riverside has created a computer programming language that will automate “laboratory-on-a-chip” technologies used in DNA sequencing, drug discovery, virus detection and other biomedical applications. [More]
Ultra-Sensitive Nano-Chip can Detect Cancer at Early Stages

Ultra-Sensitive Nano-Chip can Detect Cancer at Early Stages

Today, the majority of cancers are detected on the macroscopic level, when the tumor is already composed of millions of cancer cells and the disease is starting to advance into a more mature phase. [More]
UNSW Chemists Invent New Type of Tiny Lab-on-a-Chip Device

UNSW Chemists Invent New Type of Tiny Lab-on-a-Chip Device

UNSW Australia chemists have invented a new type of tiny lab-on-a-chip device that could have a diverse range of applications, including to detect toxic gases, fabricate integrated circuits and screen biological molecules. [More]
Center for Advanced Design and Manufacturing of Integrated Microfluidics Established at UC-Irvine

Center for Advanced Design and Manufacturing of Integrated Microfluidics Established at UC-Irvine

On April 10, at the inaugural meeting of the newly established Center for Advanced Design and Manufacturing of Integrated Microfluidics (CADMIM), 13 industry partners joined Abraham Lee, UC-Irvine CADMIM Center Director, and Ian Papautsky, UC-CEAS CADMIM Center Director, at the UC Irvine Samuel School of Engineering. [More]
Microfluidics to Create Inexpensive ‘Lab on a Chip’ Wins SPARK Competition

Microfluidics to Create Inexpensive ‘Lab on a Chip’ Wins SPARK Competition

The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and Society for Science & the Public (SSP) today announced winners of the Science, Play and Research Kit (SPARK) Competition, a challenge to reimagine the chemistry set for the 21st century. Winners were selected in two categories: prototypes – projects that are operational and demonstrable - and ideations – fleshed out project ideas that have not yet been developed into prototypes, but have a strong potential for development. [More]
Tania Konry Develops ScanDrop for Detecting Variety of Biological Specimens

Tania Konry Develops ScanDrop for Detecting Variety of Biological Specimens

Northeastern University professor of pharmaceutical sciences, Tania Konry, has developed a single instrument that can conduct a wide range of biological scans in a fraction of the time and cost of industry standard equipment. That's because it uses considerably less material and ultra-sensitive detection methods to do the same thing. [More]
Optical Lab on a Chip with Nanometer Precision

Optical Lab on a Chip with Nanometer Precision

About the size of a stapler, this new handheld device developed at EFPL is able to test a large number of proteins in our body all at once-a subtle combination of optical science and engineering. [More]
‘Cell Force Measurements in 3D Environments’ Selected as Lab on a Chip HOT Article

‘Cell Force Measurements in 3D Environments’ Selected as Lab on a Chip HOT Article

Congratulations to Mattia Marelli and co-authors whose paper "Cell force measurements in 3D microfabricated environments based on compliant cantilevers" has been selected as an Lab on a Chip HOT Article. [More]
Lab on a Chip Publishes Paper on Cell Force Measurements in 3D Microfabricated Environments

Lab on a Chip Publishes Paper on Cell Force Measurements in 3D Microfabricated Environments

Congratulations to Mattia Marelli and co-authors for their cover page paper "Cell force measurements in 3D microfabricated environments based on compliant cantilevers" published in Lab on a Chip. [More]
Bio-Nano-Chips Hold Promise for Non-Invasive Serial Serum Antiepileptic Drug Measurements

Bio-Nano-Chips Hold Promise for Non-Invasive Serial Serum Antiepileptic Drug Measurements

Medications remain the mainstay of epilepsy treatment, and to date there are no FDA-approved devices that provide an accurate means of detection for generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS), or convulsions, during activities of daily living. [More]