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Researchers Realize Optical Control of 2D Nanomaterial Photo Luminescence

Researchers Realize Optical Control of 2D Nanomaterial Photo Luminescence

Plasmonic nanophotonics and two dimensional materials are hot topics for recent optics and condensed mater physics. How to combine surface plasmon and plat 2D materials, such as graphene and MoS2, and realize excitation light active control of material opto-electronic properties, is very important for the future application. [More]
Experimental Interferometer Helps Prove Magnetic Field for Light

Experimental Interferometer Helps Prove Magnetic Field for Light

In electronics, changing the path of electrons and manipulating how they flow is as easy as applying a magnetic field. [More]
Chemical Composition of Lithium Iron Phosphate Nanocrystals Mapped Using Ptychography

Chemical Composition of Lithium Iron Phosphate Nanocrystals Mapped Using Ptychography

A record-setting X-ray microscopy experiment may have ushered in a new era for nanoscale imaging. Working at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), a collaboration of researchers used low energy or “soft” X-rays to image structures only five nanometers in size. [More]
Ommaditias' Nanonipples Complicate Analysis of Common Fly’s Compound Eyes

Ommaditias' Nanonipples Complicate Analysis of Common Fly’s Compound Eyes

In our vain human struggle to kill flies, our hands and swatters often come up lacking. This is due to no fault of our own, but rather to flies' compound eyes. Arranged in a hexagonal, convex pattern, compound eyes consist of hundreds of optical units called ommatidia, which together bestow upon flies a nearly 360-degree field of vision. [More]
Scientists Test Silicon-Based ‘Photonic Crystal Nanocavity’

Scientists Test Silicon-Based ‘Photonic Crystal Nanocavity’

Unlike electronic circuits, optical, or "photonic", circuits work with light rather than electricity, which makes them 10 to 100 times faster. They are also more energy-efficient because they show lower heat loss, better signal-to-noise ratios and are less susceptible to interference. Used especially for communications (e.g. fiber optics), optical circuits may use tiny optical cavities as 'switches' that can block or allow the flow of light, similarly to transistors in electronics. [More]
Nanophotonic Integrated Circuits Using Silver Nanowire and Atomically Thin Material

Nanophotonic Integrated Circuits Using Silver Nanowire and Atomically Thin Material

A new combination of materials can efficiently guide electricity and light along the same tiny wire, a finding that could be a step towards building computer chips capable of transporting digital information at the speed of light. [More]
Innovative Method to Build Hybrid Nanostructures and Plasmon-Driven Photocatalysts

Innovative Method to Build Hybrid Nanostructures and Plasmon-Driven Photocatalysts

An innovative synthesis method developed by a group of researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD) allows creating hybrid nanostructures by joining different nanoparticles using an ‘intermedium’ or connector nanoparticle. [More]
Laser Measures Nanomechanical Properties of Tiny Structures Undergoing Stress and Heating

Laser Measures Nanomechanical Properties of Tiny Structures Undergoing Stress and Heating

A new research platform uses a laser to measure the "nanomechanical" properties of tiny structures undergoing stress and heating, an approach likely to yield insights to improve designs for microelectronics and batteries. [More]
Innovative Optical Amplifier Design by Combining Nanoplasmonics and Optical Microresonators

Innovative Optical Amplifier Design by Combining Nanoplasmonics and Optical Microresonators

By combining plasmonics and optical microresonators, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have created a new optical amplifier (or laser) design, paving the way for power-on-a-chip applications. [More]
NIST Technique Enables Optical Microscopes to Measure 3D Shapes at Nanometer-Scale Resolution

NIST Technique Enables Optical Microscopes to Measure 3D Shapes at Nanometer-Scale Resolution

Recent experiments have confirmed* that a technique developed several years ago at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) can enable optical microscopes to measure the three-dimensional (3-D) shape of objects at nanometer-scale resolution—far below the normal resolution limit for optical microscopy (about 250 nanometers for green light). [More]