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JPK Instruments NanoWizard® AFM family

JPK Instruments NanoWizard® AFM family

The NanoWizard® AFM family answers the advanced and complex questions of tomorrow's research delivered TODAY. It provides specialized solutions e.g., for soft matter and life sciences applications (BioScience version), materials and polymer research (NanoScience version) or nano-optics applications (NanoOptics version).

Multiple uses for the JPK NanoWizard AFM System in the Smart Interfaces in Environmental Nanotechnology Group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Multiple uses for the JPK NanoWizard AFM System in the Smart Interfaces in Environmental Nanotechnology Group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Dr Rosa Espinosa-Marzal and members from her research group discuss results from their JPK NanoWizard® AFM system at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

MIT Atomic Force Microscope Scans Images 2,000 Times Faster

MIT Atomic Force Microscope Scans Images 2,000 Times Faster

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) engineers have designed a new atomic force microscope (AFM) that has the capability to scan images 2,000 times faster than models currently on the market. The microscope enables nearly real-time video of nanoscale chemical processes.

Renishaw’s inVia confocal Raman microscope connects to Bruker’s Dimension Icon AFM

Renishaw’s inVia confocal Raman microscope connects to Bruker’s Dimension Icon AFM

Renishaw is an experienced supplier of integrated Raman-AFM solutions, having offered them for over 16 years. The latest addition to the range of instruments it supports is Bruker’s Dimension Icon AFM.

Scientists Develop Novel AFM Technique to Further Understanding of Ligand-Receptor Binding

Scientists Develop Novel AFM Technique to Further Understanding of Ligand-Receptor Binding

A new high resolution method, that uses atomic force microscopy, has been developed that allows the exact shape of a receptor and it's affinity towards a particular ligand to be measured simultaneously. This has never been achieved before and will prove extremely useful in understanding the complex mechanisms behind cell communication.

High-Speed AFM Reveals Deformation of Cell Membranes by Protein Complex

High-Speed AFM Reveals Deformation of Cell Membranes by Protein Complex

Cell membranes are very elastic. They can become distorted when they are asked to do so, when the cell divides, or when a virus detaches itself from the cell. In both cases, the membrane is deformed by a protein complex called ESCRT-III.

Scientists Analyze Corneal Surface Nanopatterns in 23 Insect Orders Using Atomic Force Microscopy

Scientists Analyze Corneal Surface Nanopatterns in 23 Insect Orders Using Atomic Force Microscopy

In 1952, the legendary British mathematician and cryptographer Alan Turing proposed a model, which assumes formation of complex patterns through chemical interaction of two diffusing reagents. Russian scientists managed to prove that the corneal surface nanopatterns in 23 insect orders completely fit into this model.

AFM and STM Help Identify Atomic Species at Surface of Anatase Titanium Dioxide

AFM and STM Help Identify Atomic Species at Surface of Anatase Titanium Dioxide

A NIMS research team successfully identified the atoms and common defects existing at the most stable surface of the anatase form of titanium dioxide by characterizing this material at the atomic scale with scanning probe microscopy. This work was published under open access policy in the online version of Nature Communications on June 29, 2015.

Asylum Research AFMs Guide Thin Film Process Development

Asylum Research AFMs Guide Thin Film Process Development

The intrinsic dimensions of thin films (thickness, grain and domain sizes, etc.) and the strong dependence of performance on film properties demand tools with nanoscale resolution. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has long been used to measure thin film roughness and uniformity, and that remains one of the most common measurements made with AFM today.

New GetStarted Feature on Asylum Research AFMs Calculates Optimum Parameters for Easier, More Productive Imaging

New GetStarted Feature on Asylum Research AFMs Calculates Optimum Parameters for Easier, More Productive Imaging

Researchers sometimes struggle to get good images using atomic force microscopy (AFM) because of the complexity of optimizing imaging parameters. The new GetStarted™ feature on Oxford Instruments Asylum Research AFMs eliminates this challenge, making AFM operation much simpler and more productive.