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DNA-Based Electromechanical Switch Holds Promise for Nanoscale Computing

DNA-Based Electromechanical Switch Holds Promise for Nanoscale Computing

Researchers from the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) and the University of Washington have shown the possibility of using DNA-based electromechanical switches for nanoscale computing.

Researchers Develop New Method for Tracking the Motion of Nanoscale Viruses

Researchers Develop New Method for Tracking the Motion of Nanoscale Viruses

A novel technique that uses optical fibre to track the motion of single, nanoscale viruses has been developed. It is hoped that this technique will allow researchers to understand the mechanisms by which viruses multiply and accumulate.

Chemists Devise Faster Rolling Nano-Walkers

Chemists Devise Faster Rolling Nano-Walkers

Physical chemists have devised a rolling DNA-based motor that’s 1,000 times faster than any other synthetic DNA motor, giving it potential for real-world applications, such as disease diagnostics. Nature Nanotechnology is publishing the finding.

Nanostructures in Tarantula Hair Could be Key for Improved Screen Design

Nanostructures in Tarantula Hair Could be Key for Improved Screen Design

Researchers have determined that the bright blue colour of tarantulas are the result of multilayer nanostructures present in their hair. The researchers hope to mimic the hairs properties to create new dyes, and to improve the performance of computer and TV screens.

Researchers Develop New Nanocarriers for Brain Cancer Treatment

Researchers Develop New Nanocarriers for Brain Cancer Treatment

Ting Xu, a polymer researcher from the Materials Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), has developed a novel set of nanocarriers that are produced from the self-assembly of polymers and amphiphilic peptides. Amphiphiles are a type of chemical compounds that have both lipophilic and hydrophilic characteristics. Micelles are spherical amphiphile aggregates. These nanocarriers have a structure of coiled-coil 3-helix micelles and hence, referred to as 3HM.

Scientists Develop Novel AFM Technique to Further Understanding of Ligand-Receptor Binding

Scientists Develop Novel AFM Technique to Further Understanding of Ligand-Receptor Binding

A new high resolution method, that uses atomic force microscopy, has been developed that allows the exact shape of a receptor and it's affinity towards a particular ligand to be measured simultaneously. This has never been achieved before and will prove extremely useful in understanding the complex mechanisms behind cell communication.

Quantum Dots Show Promise for Deep Brain Imaging

Quantum Dots Show Promise for Deep Brain Imaging

New research has shown quantum dots can be used to map neural networks in the brain by allowing neural signals to be visualised in real time. This breakthrough will allow further insight into neural communication in both normal and abnormal brains.

Targeted Nanoparticle Delivery System for Improved Drug Delivery with Minimum Side Effects

Targeted Nanoparticle Delivery System for Improved Drug Delivery with Minimum Side Effects

A nanoparticle drug delivery system has been developed by the researchers from the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA for the antibiotic moxifloxacin. This system improves the efficacy of the drug and also minimizes the side effects.

Flexible Microlenses that can Capture Panoramic Images have been Developed

Flexible Microlenses that can Capture Panoramic Images have been Developed

A team of engineers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed miniature lenses with a wide range of vision inspired by the multi-faceted eyes of insects. For the first time ever, flexible, Fresnel zone plate microlenses featuring a large field of view have been developed based on this novel approach.

Researchers Develop Nanoscale DNA Machines That Could Walk Autonomously

Researchers Develop Nanoscale DNA Machines That Could Walk Autonomously

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a nanoscale machine made of DNA that can randomly walk in any direction across bumpy surfaces. Future applications of such a DNA walker might include a cancer detector that could roam the human body searching for cancerous cells and tagging them for medical imaging or drug targeting.