Posted in | Nanomaterials

Dais' NanoClear Module Produces First Water in China

Published on February 2, 2011 at 6:10 AM

Dais Analytic Corporation (OTCBB: DLYT) announced today it has reached an important milestone in the development and commercialization of NanoClear™, Dais' water cleaning process able to remove most contaminants from water (including sea and wastewater).

The NanoClear module being assembled in Beijing, China, has produced 'first water'. This module is an initial component of the multi-million dollar purchase order signed between Dais, Genertec America, Inc., and CAST/OSC Beijing in April of 2010.

The pilot module enables the Chinese customer to potentially offer 'zero discharge waste water treatment' using Dais' Aqualyte™ membrane, and is successfully processing approximately 1,250 gallons of wastewater per day producing drinkable water about 1,000 times cleaner than that produced by other forms of standard water cleaning technologies. After an extended test period, more modules will be added to complete the program in mid-2012.

Tim Tangredi, CEO of Dais Analytic, said, "Achieving 'first water' is an important performance milestone for Dais on two levels -- first it underscores the scalability of the NanoClear process and materials used and tested by a third party (China's Academy of Environmental Sciences) and, second, this achievement further validates the contribution the disruptive Dais nanotechnology brings to an industry seeking better answers."

Tangredi added, "It is important to note the Chinese have published papers stating it will have exploited all of its available water supplies by 2030. We see a tremendous opportunity in China working together to address its growing need for clean water which should continue to find Dais increasing exports while creating new, clean-technology jobs."

Scott Ehrenberg, Chief Technology Officer of Dais Analytic, said, "In addition to this initial deployment of NanoClear technology in China, Dais is anticipating to build a 'very visual' NanoClear pilot in Pasco County, Florida, which we would like to have open for the world water community to see in person and with internet access by the end of 2011."

Key Facts

  • China's per capita natural freshwater resources are expected to decline to 1,875 m3 by 2033, down from 2,156 m3 in 2007 (among the lowest per capita for a major country). 1,000m3 per capita is regarded the world water poverty mark. (World Bank)
  • 60% of China's 660 cities are short of water. (World Bank)
  • 108 cities, including Beijing and Tianjin, face serious water shortages. Beijing has 230 m3 per capita of fresh water, far below the world water poverty mark. (World Bank)
  • South China (the Yangtze River basin and areas to its south) accounted for 80.4% of the nation's naturally available water resources but only 53.3% of the population, whereas Northern China accounted for 19.6% of the water resources but 46.7% of the population in 2000. (World Bank)
  • In 2006, nearly half of China's major cities did not meet provincial drinking-water quality standards. (OECD)

Source: http://www.daisanalytic.com/

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