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HyperSolar’s Protective Coating Stabilizes Solar Nanoparticles for Renewable Hydrogen Production

Published on May 3, 2012 at 1:54 AM

By Cameron Chai

HyperSolar, a company developing innovative technology to generate renewable hydrogen from solar power and water, has declared that it has achieved a major landmark in the protection and stabilization of its solar nanoparticles utilized in producing renewable hydrogen.

A novel polymer coating developed by HyperSolar has successfully stabilized the inorganic photoelectrodes used for producing hydrogen fuel from wastewater and solar power. The company’s Chief Executive Officer, Tim Young stated that semiconductor materials’ stabilization against photocorrosion is one of the major challenges in utilizing a solar to fuel conversion process. The development of inexpensive, efficient protective coating with superior electrical conductivity is an important milestone in the advancement of a cost-efficient solution for producing renewable hydrogen using solar power and water.

Traditional hydrogen production technology is a highly expensive technique wherein water molecules split into oxygen and hydrogen. HyperSolar is devising an inexpensive nanotechnology method that facilitates hydrogen production from wastewater. This innovative solar-powered nanoparticle system imitates photosynthesis for hydrogen production. The nanoparticles developed by the company act as one-way machines to generate pure hydrogen and clean water by detoxifying wastewater in the presence of solar energy. Since this nanotechnology method does not require any other energy source, it is a highly economical and commercially feasible technique to produce zero-carbon, renewable hydrogen.

This renewable hydrogen can be utilized as a direct substitute for conventional hydrogen typically manufactured through natural gas reformation. Recently, the University of California, Santa Barbara and HyperSolar have inked a yearlong sponsored research deal to ramp up the development process and to ensure that key milestones of the company are achieved.

Source: http://www.hypersolar.com

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