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Study Analyzes Ability of Typical Water Pretreatment Methods to Remove Engineered Nanoparticles

Study Analyzes Ability of Typical Water Pretreatment Methods to Remove Engineered Nanoparticles

The increased use of engineered nanoparticles (ENMs) in commercial and industrial applications is raising concern over the environmental and health effects of nanoparticles released into the water supply. A timely study that analyzes the ability of typical water pretreatment methods to remove titanium dioxide, the most commonly used ENM, is published in Environmental Engineering Science, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Environmental Engineering Science website until April 10, 2015. [More]
Discrepancies in Toxicology Studies of Cellulose Nanocrystals

Discrepancies in Toxicology Studies of Cellulose Nanocrystals

Are cellulose nanocrystals harmful to human health? The answer might depend on the route of exposure, according to a review of the literature by a Virginia Tech scientist, but there have been few studies and many questions remain. [More]
Dunkin' Brands Agrees for Removal of Nanomaterials from Powdered Donuts

Dunkin' Brands Agrees for Removal of Nanomaterials from Powdered Donuts

Dunkin' Brands, the parent company of the Dunkin' Donuts chain, has agreed to remove titanium dioxide, a whitening agent that is commonly a source of nanomaterials, from all powdered sugar used to make the company's donuts. As a result of this progress, the advocacy group As You Sow has withdrawn a shareholder proposal asking Dunkin' to assess and reduce the risks of using nanomaterials in its food products. [More]
NIST Issues New Silver Nanoparticle Reference Material for Studying Associated Environmental, Health and Safety Risks

NIST Issues New Silver Nanoparticle Reference Material for Studying Associated Environmental, Health and Safety Risks

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has issued a new silver nanoparticle reference material to support researchers studying potential environmental, health and safety risks associated with the nanoparticles, which are being incorporated in a growing number of consumer and industrial products for their antimicrobial properties. The new NIST test material is believed to be the first of its kind to stabilize the highly reactive silver particles in a freeze-dried, polymer coated, nanoparticle cake for long-term storage. [More]
Properly Functioning Septic Tank Could Eliminate Toxicity of Nanoparticles

Properly Functioning Septic Tank Could Eliminate Toxicity of Nanoparticles

What do a human colon, septic tank, copper nanoparticles and zebrafish have in common? They were the key components used by researchers at the University of California, Riverside and UCLA to study the impact copper nanoparticles, which are found in everything from paint to cosmetics, have on organisms inadvertently exposed to them. [More]
Latest Insights on Cellulose Nanocrystal Toxicity

Latest Insights on Cellulose Nanocrystal Toxicity

Novel nanomaterials derived from cellulose have many promising industrial applications, are biobased and biodegradable, and can be produced at relatively low cost. Their potential toxicity--whether ingested, inhaled, on contact with the skin, or on exposure to cells within the body--is a topic of intense discussion, and the latest evidence and insights on cellulose nanocrystal toxicity are presented in a Review article in Industrial Biotechnology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available on the Industrial Biotechnology website. [More]
Antimicrobial Silver Nanoparticles Induce Stress in the Endoplasmic Reticulum, Demonstrating Nanotoxicity

Antimicrobial Silver Nanoparticles Induce Stress in the Endoplasmic Reticulum, Demonstrating Nanotoxicity

Whereas resistance to antibiotics complicates certain treatments, antimicrobial silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are gaining popularity for medical use. These particles are toxic for certain bacteria, but what about for humans? Researchers at INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier Research Centre have taken a step toward understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that affect these particles. [More]
Lowly Roundworm Helps Measure Toxicity of Nanoparticles

Lowly Roundworm Helps Measure Toxicity of Nanoparticles

The lowly roundworm is the star of an ambitious Rice University project to measure the toxicity of nanoparticles. [More]
Novel Best Practice Guide for Safe Use of Nanoparticles in Packaging Industries

Novel Best Practice Guide for Safe Use of Nanoparticles in Packaging Industries

A novel “Best Practice Guide for the Safe Handling and Use of Nanoparticles in Packaging Industries” is now available to support those working with nanomaterials at all stages in the development of packaging products. [More]
Exposure to Nanoparticles May Increase Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases

Exposure to Nanoparticles May Increase Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases

Nanoparticles, extremely tiny particles measured in billionths of a meter, are increasingly everywhere, and especially in biomedical products. Their toxicity has been researched in general terms, but now a team of Israeli scientists has for the first time found that exposure nanoparticles (NPs) of silicon dioxide (SiO2) can play a major role in the development of cardiovascular diseases when the NP cross tissue and cellular barriers and also find their way into the circulatory system. [More]