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EU NanoSafety Cluster WG4 Offers Online NanoSafety Database Survey

EU NanoSafety Cluster WG4 Offers Online NanoSafety Database Survey

The EU NanoSafety Cluster WG4 (Database) announces immediate availability of an online NanoSafety Database Survey https://tinyurl.com/wg4dbSurvey [More]
Nano-Silver Can Penetrate Human Cells and Cause Damage

Nano-Silver Can Penetrate Human Cells and Cause Damage

Endocrine disrupters are not the only worrying chemicals that ordinary consumers are exposed to in everyday life. Also nanoparticles of silver, found in e.g. dietary supplements, cosmetics and food packaging, now worry scientists. A new study from the University of Southern Denmark shows that nano-silver can penetrate our cells and cause damage. [More]
Study on Impact of Residual Nano-Silver in the Environment

Study on Impact of Residual Nano-Silver in the Environment

It is well known that, in the form of free ions, silver particles can be highly toxic to aquatic organisms. Recent research by Eawag and EPFL provides a better understanding about the critical doses and about how the organisms respond to these kinds of stresses. [More]
Researchers Study Effects of Transition Metal Oxide Nanoparticles on Human Lung Cells

Researchers Study Effects of Transition Metal Oxide Nanoparticles on Human Lung Cells

Nanoparticles are used in all kinds of applications — electronics, medicine, cosmetics, even environmental clean-ups. More than 2,800 commercially available applications are now based on nanoparticles, and by 2017, the field is expected to bring in nearly $50 billion worldwide. [More]
Clarkson Student Presents Nanoparticle Research at Sustainable Nanotechnology Conference

Clarkson Student Presents Nanoparticle Research at Sustainable Nanotechnology Conference

Rifat Emrah Ozel recently presented his nanoparticle research on an international stage. [More]
Major Project to Investigate Safety of Nanoparticles in Facade Paint

Major Project to Investigate Safety of Nanoparticles in Facade Paint

Five Empa laboratories were involved in the EU «NanoHouse» project, along with four other European research institutes and four industrial partners. The aim of the project was to investigate the opportunities and risks presented by the nanomaterials used in the surface coatings applied to building façades. For the first time not only were freshly manufactured products studied to see if they set free nanoparticles, but also aged samples. [More]
New Method for Accurate Determination of Nanomaterial Toxicity

New Method for Accurate Determination of Nanomaterial Toxicity

EPFL researchers have developed a method for accurately determining the toxicity of nanomaterials. By using optical techniques, they are able to measure the concentration of the oxidizing substances produced by a damaged cell. Furthermore, this research also offers a new way to know more about the mechanisms of oxidative stress. [More]
Nanotoxicology Study Focuses on Effects of Nanoparticles on Human Immune System Cells

Nanotoxicology Study Focuses on Effects of Nanoparticles on Human Immune System Cells

In a growing number of industries, workers are often unknowingly exposed to nanoparticles (NPs). Do they enter the body? Could they have an impact on health? Professor Denis Girard from the INRS–Institut Armand-Frappier Research Centre has had the foresight to study the potential toxicity of a wide variety of NPs with a view to setting the record straight before problems occur. [More]
Clarkson University Team Receives NSF Grant to Explore Health Effects of Nanoparticles

Clarkson University Team Receives NSF Grant to Explore Health Effects of Nanoparticles

Nanoparticles are used to produce sunscreens, scratch-resistant coatings, deodorants and other products, but researching their health effects began only recently. [More]
Duke’s Center for Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology Receives $15 M Grant Renewal

Duke’s Center for Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology Receives $15 M Grant Renewal

The nanomaterials revolution has made exceedingly tiny engineered particles a hot commodity, used in products from clothing to sunscreen to electronics. But the very properties that make them so useful -- vanishingly small size and high surface area—may have unintended consequences as they enter living organisms and the environment. [More]