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Clarkson Student Presents Nanoparticle Research at Sustainable Nanotechnology Conference

Clarkson Student Presents Nanoparticle Research at Sustainable Nanotechnology Conference

Rifat Emrah Ozel recently presented his nanoparticle research on an international stage. [More]
Major Project to Investigate Safety of Nanoparticles in Facade Paint

Major Project to Investigate Safety of Nanoparticles in Facade Paint

Five Empa laboratories were involved in the EU «NanoHouse» project, along with four other European research institutes and four industrial partners. The aim of the project was to investigate the opportunities and risks presented by the nanomaterials used in the surface coatings applied to building façades. For the first time not only were freshly manufactured products studied to see if they set free nanoparticles, but also aged samples. [More]
New Method for Accurate Determination of Nanomaterial Toxicity

New Method for Accurate Determination of Nanomaterial Toxicity

EPFL researchers have developed a method for accurately determining the toxicity of nanomaterials. By using optical techniques, they are able to measure the concentration of the oxidizing substances produced by a damaged cell. Furthermore, this research also offers a new way to know more about the mechanisms of oxidative stress. [More]
Nanotoxicology Study Focuses on Effects of Nanoparticles on Human Immune System Cells

Nanotoxicology Study Focuses on Effects of Nanoparticles on Human Immune System Cells

In a growing number of industries, workers are often unknowingly exposed to nanoparticles (NPs). Do they enter the body? Could they have an impact on health? Professor Denis Girard from the INRS–Institut Armand-Frappier Research Centre has had the foresight to study the potential toxicity of a wide variety of NPs with a view to setting the record straight before problems occur. [More]
Clarkson University Team Receives NSF Grant to Explore Health Effects of Nanoparticles

Clarkson University Team Receives NSF Grant to Explore Health Effects of Nanoparticles

Nanoparticles are used to produce sunscreens, scratch-resistant coatings, deodorants and other products, but researching their health effects began only recently. [More]
Duke’s Center for Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology Receives $15 M Grant Renewal

Duke’s Center for Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology Receives $15 M Grant Renewal

The nanomaterials revolution has made exceedingly tiny engineered particles a hot commodity, used in products from clothing to sunscreen to electronics. But the very properties that make them so useful -- vanishingly small size and high surface area—may have unintended consequences as they enter living organisms and the environment. [More]
Researchers Explore Iron Nanoparticles to Address Lindane Problem

Researchers Explore Iron Nanoparticles to Address Lindane Problem

For many years two companies located in Bizkaia, Bilbao Chemicals (Barakaldo 1947-1987) and Nexana (Erandio 1952-1982), had been manufacturing lindane and dumping it into the environment with no control whatsoever. Today we have become aware of the need to solve the problems caused by this dumping and the difficulty in achieving this since there is no viable process that will safely destroy the lindane mixed with the soil. [More]
New Reliable Method to Detect Silver Nanoparticles in Food

New Reliable Method to Detect Silver Nanoparticles in Food

Over the last few years, the use of nanomaterials for water treatment, food packaging, pesticides, cosmetics and other industries has increased. For example, farmers have used silver nanoparticles as a pesticide because of their capability to suppress the growth of harmful organisms. [More]

RUSNANOPRIZE Nomination Process Reveals Great Emerging Technologies in Russia

Nanotechnological Society of Russia is involved in the process of attracting strong potential applicants for the RUSNANOPRIZE Award 2013. It occurred to be a good possibility to meet break-through industrial technolog... [More]
Jagged Edges of Graphene Dangerous to Human Cells

Jagged Edges of Graphene Dangerous to Human Cells

Researchers from Brown University have shown how tiny graphene microsheets — ultra-thin materials with a number of commercial applications — could be big trouble for human cells. [More]
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