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Microbattery Development Boosted With mPhase Extending Research Agreement With Rutgers

Published on July 10, 2007 at 10:27 AM

mPhase Technologies today announced that it has signed an additional extension of its original cooperative research agreement with Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, as related to lithium-based chemistries for a functional reserve microbattery prototype. mPhase announced an initial agreement extension in February.

The amended statement of work represents yet a further extension of a previous work plan which commenced in 2006, and enumerates a mutually agreed-upon menu of responsibilities and functional tasks that members of the Rutgers technical team will provide to mPhase going forward.

The work plan’s focus is for the partners to develop and characterize a functional reserve microbattery prototype developed around lithium-based chemistries.

Ron Durando, President and CEO of mPhase Technologies, said: “Our collaboration with Rutgers is exploring alternative chemistries and architectures, inclusive of non-aqueous solutions, which encompass various lithium electrolytes. This is an area of potential exciting breakthroughs, as the ability to develop functionality with lithium electrolytes with contact angles on our novel architecture, will permit rechargeable batteries on the nano-scale. These are truly exciting times for the partners.”

The development agreement mPhase has with Rutgers continues to build on mPhase’s current work to develop micro batteries that are capable of supporting a range of lithium based chemistries for applications requiring reserved based primary and rechargeable power systems. The batteries mPhase Technologies are developing can be either configured as individual power cells, or potentially configured in arrayed arrangements depending on the power needs of the electronic devices requiring power.

Initially the batteries are targeted for powering small electronic devices and other applications requiring long shelf life and controlled activation.

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