Nanotechnology and the Environment Videos

Nanotechnology and the Environment Videos
The noted researcher in biomedical optics discusses new imaging techniques involving nanotechnology, plasmonics, and the use of molecular sentinels for biosensing and diagnostics.
Radiant Shield Coating (RSC) by Hyperion Environmental uses the power of light to keep building exteriors clean. Over time, abrasive methods like power washing can damage surfaces beyond repair and harsh chemicals harm the environment. Radiant Shield is environmentally friendly and can last years with just one application. Continually re-energized under direct or ambient sunlight, RSC destroys organic contaminants before they accumulate, keeping buildings cleaner, longer than ever before.
Tiny particles of silver designed to kill germs are being put into socks to control odor. But as this ScienCentral News video explains, what happens to that nanosilver later is concerning some scientists.
Presented by MANCEF and the University of Utah Center for Engineering Innovation at the Grand America Hotel, Salt Lake City, COMS 2014 is the 19th edition of the international conference on commercializing micro- and nanotechnology.
IBM has unveiled a novel nanomembrane technology that stands to alleviate the growing shortage of drinkable water worldwide. Scientists at IBM Research, together with collaborators from Central Glass, the King Abdul Aziz City for Science and Technology, and the University of Texas, Austin have created a new membrane that filters out salts as well as potentially harmful toxins in water such as arsenic while using less energy than other forms of water purification.
Nanotechnology deals with particles so small they are measured in billionths of a metre, and unions are calling for the substances created to face strict regulations. They say workers handling the high-tech products need to be protected, in case like asbestos last century, they turn out to be toxic.
A piece of chemically treated cotton cloth is able to separate crude oil from sea water (both from Mexico Gulf) completely within seconds by using gravity alone. It can be developed into various effective tools for cleaning up the oil spill in Mexico Gulf. The treated cloth allows water to path through but not oil. The novel surface chemical treatment method is developed by University of Pittsburgh.
This video examines the work of Michael Wong in using gold and palladium nanoparticles to remove contaminants from water
Nanotechnology can help provide clean water for NASA astronauts, disaster relief teams, and field clinics. The CEO of a Vermont nanotech start-up company drinks water out of the Charles River to make his point and MOS tests the water filtering device in front of a live NECN audience.
UniSA and SA Water have extended a research partnership deal that has seen SA Water invest $3.5m of funding into finding smart ways to manage and re-use water in South Australia.
Presented by MANCEF and the University of Utah Center for Engineering Innovation at the Grand America Hotel, Salt Lake City, COMS 2014 is the 19th edition of the international conference on commercializing micro- and nanotechnology.
Scientists and engineers are collaborating across disciplines to develop and network miniaturized intelligent nanosensors that can rapidly and remotely detect change in their surroundings. These sensors have a wide range of potential applications: environmental, medical, military and transportation. This workshop will focus on revealing the chemistry and physics behind the creation and application of these sensors.
Interview with Lloyd Tran of the California Institute of Nanotechnology about the potential for green nanotechnology.
The health and environmental effects of carbon nanoparticles, which are widely used in electronics and medicine, are not well understood. Researchers at Brown University have discovered that certain types of carbon nanoparticles can be environmentally toxic to adult fruit flies, although they were found to be benign when added to food for larvae.
Some are calling it a revolution in manufacturing technology. But, will nanotechnology be a "green" industry? It's a question that some scientists are saying needs to be answered now, before nano-tech goes big-time. This ScienCentral News video has more.
TurboBeads magnetic nanoparticles are used to magnetically extract a dye (methylorange) from drinking water
Nano-sized particles of silver are terrific at fighting bacteria and mold, and are being used in hospital settings and for food storage. But they're also being incorporated into more casual types of consumer products, like children's toys and clothing. Could this lead to a harmful accumulation of nano silver in our wastewater treatment plants and in our rivers and streams?
The Air Quality Engineering research lab at Virginia Tech is conducting a study of the cross-media (air, water, AND soil) fate of nanoparticles in the environment. This video summarizes the background and motivation for the research in lay terms.
In March 2010, researchers from Rice University in Houston traveled to to Guanajuato, Mexico, to conduct field tests on a new nanotechnology for removing arsenic from drinking water. The system uses nanoscale magnetite, or nanorust. The tests are some of the first that attempt to move nanotechnology beyond the laboratory and into the real world. The ongoing research by Rice's Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology (CBEN) is funded by the National Science Foundation.
Scientists find that air pollution is even worse for you than previously thought. As this ScienCentral News video explains, new research shows how tiny particles from vehicle emissions can cause heart disease and other problems.
Discussion on the impact of nanotechnology on the environment and human safety issues. The lack of government regulation and standard is a growing concern for professionals working in the nanotechnology field.
Why watch catalysts in action? Berkeley Lab's Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai discuss how a ringside seat to fundamental chemistry could lead to more efficient catalysts, cleaner skies, and less industrial waste.