Nanotechnology in Aerospace Videos

Nanotechnology in Aerospace Videos
Nasa's plan for looking after astronauts' health during long space flights - nanobots!
GE's scientists at its Global Research center in New York show a lab test of advanced nanotechnology that will one day keep ice from forming on aircraft engine blades and wind turbines.
This animated video from the Institute for Scientific Research Inc. demonstrates how carbon Nanotubes could be used to produce a space elevator.
An atomic force microscope from nanoSurf is set to change our understanding of the make up of the soil on Mars. The AFM is included as part of the instrumentation aboard the Phoenix Mars Lander
Documentary showcases the future of the . It was once thought as science fiction but the reality of it is closer than we think thanks to the advancement in nanotechnology and carbon nanotubes. Interviews with experts in all disciplines in the scientific community to detail the construction of the space elevator.
Traditionally electrical charges are carried and sometimes shielded using metal but this isn't ideal- especially if the current has to run past or through explosive material like petrol tanks. The solution: Carbon Nanotubes. Microphase have mixed polymers (extracted from biomass) with their nanotubes and produced stronger, safer, and more electrically conductive materials then their metallic equivalent. According to Microphase, some of the most recent Boeing aircrafts employ this technology.
This animation is a scientific illustration of the operation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.
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