IEEE Complete Nanoelectronics Standards Roadmap

The IEEE has completed its Nanoelectronics Standards Roadmap(NESR), which establishes a framework for creating standards to help industry transition electronic applications based on nanotechnology from the laboratory to commercial use. The nanotech community can review and comment on the document, which is posted at http://standards.ieee.org/announcements/nano/07/Nano07.html, either by e-mail or at a “town-hall”-style meeting on 22 May at the NSTI Nanotech 2007 Conference in Santa Clara, Calif.

The IEEE Nanoelectronic Standards Roadmapping Initiative, which began in early 2003, is co-chaired by Evelyn Hirt of Battelle and John Tucker of Keithley Instruments. Its members come from industry, government and academia and from many nations. The roadmap focuses on standards for nanomaterials and devices that promise to yield the highest value in the near-term. It also anticipates standards likely to be needed at higher levels of integration for functional blocks and applications.

In 2007, the roadmap recommends the initiation of five nanoelectronic standards: three for nanomaterials involving conductive interconnects, organic sensor structures and nano-dispersions and two for nano-devices involving nanoscale sensors and nanoscale emitting devices. It also targets the start of seven nanomaterial standards and five nano-device standards in 2008.

“The many individuals who worked on the roadmap have created a rational path for managing the development of nanoelectronic standards,” says Edward Rashba, Director, New Business Ventures. “Their vision will help industry realize the potential for nano-enabled electronic products in such fields as communications, information technology, biotechnology and optoelectronics.

“The standards identified in the roadmap are intended to foster industry's growth by enabling researchers to build on each other’s findings, harmonize best practices, and support manufacturers across the value chain from materials, processing and test equipment to subsystems and systems.”

Tell Us What You Think

Do you have a review, update or anything you would like to add to this news story?

Leave your feedback
Your comment type
Submit
Azthena logo

AZoM.com powered by Azthena AI

Your AI Assistant finding answers from trusted AZoM content

Azthena logo with the word Azthena

Your AI Powered Scientific Assistant

Hi, I'm Azthena, you can trust me to find commercial scientific answers from AZoNetwork.com.

A few things you need to know before we start. Please read and accept to continue.

  • Use of “Azthena” is subject to the terms and conditions of use as set out by OpenAI.
  • Content provided on any AZoNetwork sites are subject to the site Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.
  • Large Language Models can make mistakes. Consider checking important information.

Great. Ask your question.

While we only use edited and approved content for Azthena answers, it may on occasions provide incorrect responses. Please confirm any data provided with the related suppliers or authors. We do not provide medical advice, if you search for medical information you must always consult a medical professional before acting on any information provided.

Your questions, but not your email details will be shared with OpenAI and retained for 30 days in accordance with their privacy principles.

Please do not ask questions that use sensitive or confidential information.

Read the full Terms & Conditions.